Society for Research in Child Development

Society for Research in Child Development

The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) was founded in 1933 to “stimulate and support research, to encourage cooperation among individuals engaged in the scientific study of child development, and to encourage applications of research findings”. Since then, SRCD has remained at the forefront of developmental science, providing leadership for the field amid changing scientific and social contexts. Throughout the decades, the Society has maintained its commitment to the developing child as the primary focus of scientific inquiry and to the use of that science to improve child, family, and community well-being across diverse contexts.

SRCD faces a rapidly changing environment. Technological advances, the growth of interdisciplinary research in developmental science, and increased opportunities for international collaboration open promising new avenues for scientific discovery and application. Capitalizing on these opportunities to forge an integrative developmental science, however, will require bridging disciplinary silos and national borders, and will require increased diversity in research foci and in the scientific work force. Changes in funding structures, university systems, and research processes will likewise require adaptation and innovation if the research is to remain strong and vibrant. To enable SRCD to address unfolding challenges and to take advantage of emerging opportunities for developmental science and its application, SRCD initiated a strategic planning process to identify future Society directions.




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World Association for Infant Mental Health

World Association for Infant Mental Health

The World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH) is a not-for-profit organization for scientific and educational professionals.

WAIMH’s central aim is to promote the mental wellbeing and healthy development of infants throughout the world, taking into account cultural, regional, and environmental variations, and to generate and disseminate scientific knowledge.

More specifically, WAIMH seeks to facilitate:

Increased knowledge about mental development and disorder in children from conception to three years of age
The dissemination of scientific knowledge about services for care, intervention and prevention of mental disorder, and impairment in infancy
The dissemination of evidence-based knowledge about ways to support the developmental transition to parenthood, as well as the healthy aspects of parenting and caregiving environments
The international cooperation of professionals concerned with promoting the optimal development of infants, as well as the prevention and treatment of mental disorders in the early years
Aspects of research, education, and interventions in the above areas.




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Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA)

Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA)

The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) is the leading peer-directed national organization focusing on the two most prevalent mental health conditions, depression and bipolar disorder, which affect more than 21 million Americans, account for 90% of the nation’s suicides every year, and cost $23 billion in lost workdays and other workplace losses.

DBSA’s peer-based, wellness-oriented, and empowering services and resources are available when people need them, where they need them, and how they need to receive them—online 24/7, in local support groups, in audio and video casts, or in printed materials distributed by DBSA, our chapters, and mental health care facilities across America.

Through more than 700 support groups and nearly 300 chapters, DBSA reaches millions of people each year with in-person and online peer support; current, readily understandable information about depression and bipolar disorder; and empowering tools focused on an integrated approach to wellness.




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1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.




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CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal:  A mental health site for teens administered with the help of Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  It includes resources, glossary, helps with depression, bipolar, anxiety and so much more.  If you are a teen, this a place to check out!




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National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.




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The Jung Page

The Jung Page

With the cooperation and generosity of analysts, academics, independent scholars and commentators, and the editors of several Jungian journals, The Jung Page provides a place to encounter innovative writers and to enter into a rich, ongoing conversation about psychology and culture.

It includes audio, articles, downloads, among other discussions about Jungian psychology and thoughts.  There are also resources and thoughts about Jung himself.




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Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.




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