1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal:  A mental health site for teens administered with the help of Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  It includes resources, glossary, helps with depression, bipolar, anxiety and so much more.  If you are a teen, this a place to check out!

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.

The Jung Page

The Jung Page

With the cooperation and generosity of analysts, academics, independent scholars and commentators, and the editors of several Jungian journals, The Jung Page provides a place to encounter innovative writers and to enter into a rich, ongoing conversation about psychology and culture.

It includes audio, articles, downloads, among other discussions about Jungian psychology and thoughts.  There are also resources and thoughts about Jung himself.

Our Sponsor


Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.

National Alliance for Grieving Children

National Alliance for Grieving Children

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) provides a network for nationwide communication between hundreds of  professionals and volunteers who want to share ideas, information and resources with each other to better support the grieving children and families they serve in their own communities. Through this network, the NAGC offers online education, hosts an annual symposium on children’s grief, maintains a national data base of children’s bereavement support programs and promotes national awareness to enhance public sensitivity to the issues impacting grieving children and teens.

Located on this website is grants, symposiums, memberships, blogs, RSS feeds, activities, resources, discussions and support.

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

The Compassionate Friends

The Compassionate Friends

Year after year for nearly four decades, The Compassionate Friends has spread hope to more and more bereaved families. TCF has been widely recognized as a unique lifeline for those who are dealing with the tremendous grief that follows the death of a child. The organization has built this reputation in spite of struggling with the financial ups and downs that plague nearly all nonprofits.

From these financial struggles emerged the idea that a foundation might be created with the sole purpose of guaranteeing enough financial stability for The Compassionate Friends to always “be there” to provide emotional support to those who may see no hope. In 2000, thanks to the dedication and commitment of many members and friends of TCF, that dream came true with the creation of TCF Foundation.

While TCF Foundation has come a long way since its inception, there is still a long way to go before its mission can truly be reached. As a member of TCF or simply as a caring individual, you can support TCF Foundation through donations that can take many different forms.