Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

PsychoTube

PsychoTube

Free psychology videos dealing with a myriad of topics, from Mood Disorders to Cognitive Behavioral Therapies to Anxiety Disorders.  Also listed are clinical psychology, developmental psychology, therapy, learning psychology, cognitive psychology, memory and other forms of psychotherapies.  Psychotube is a new way to share video and audio clips with other psychology teachers.
Many psychology teachers use short video and audio clips to facilitate their teaching of psychology and this site provides a way of organizing these clips.

 

The majority of these videos are Youtube or TED talks, but are very interesting and well worth the views!  You may subscribe, view the amazingly full dictionary, or glossary or of course, view the videos!

Stop Abuse for Everyone (SAFE)

Stop Abuse for Everyone (SAFE)

Stop Abuse For Everyone (SAFE) provides unique services for domestic violence victims. We help those who typically fall between the cracks of domestic violence services and few services are available: straight men, GLBT victims, teens, and the elderly. We promote that there should be services for ALL victims and accountability for all perpetrators.

Our approach is to view domestic violence as a human issue. It doesn’t matter what type of person you are, if you’re in an abusive relationship, it is the type of experience you’re having that is important!

We believe that the services you receive should be based on what you need…rather than who you are. That is the goal we work towards. Individuals experience problems based on the simple fact that they are men or women, gay or straight, old or young. SAFE addresses their individual concerns, and fills in the gaps in domestic violence services where others don’t.

Web MD Mental Health

webMDWebMD has a vast resource of Mental Health resources at your fingertips.  There are Expert Blogs, Community Help (such as WebMD Depression Help, WebMD Schizophrenia Help and so on) and ways to find a Doctor.

 

There are a plethora of ideas, thoughts and links to explore on Web MD Mental Health.  There are quizzes, articles, slideshows, and even videos to help you with your Mental Health needs.

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Minds Like Ours (MILO)

minds like oursA mental health support community (abbreviated MILO) for those 1 in 4 living with these kinds of disorders. Of course, even 1 of a million is 1 too many, but at least there is help.

Raise awareness of mental health issues with others–remind people that there are many more people that are good productive citizens who have mental health problems than there are people who are bad, nonproductive citizens!  You can take part in competitions inside MILO, unite with others, and support others like you who need to be supported.  Don’t be in it alone!

They have forums, helplines, blogs, volunteer and shop in their store. Help others and help yourself!

Make the Connection: Veterans Stories & Support

make the connectionIf you are a veteran, or a family member or a friend of a veteran and searching for help, you are not alone.  Through the US Department of Veterans Affairs, this website will offer you a plethora of help.  With connections through Facebook and through Youtube, not to mention videos onsite and self-assessments; this site is a very good place to visit when needing help that you earned.

There is also a free Veterans Crisis Line to call, a resource locator, and a very awesome site customizer.  You served our country, and served it selflessly.  Don’t let this site pass you by!

National Coalition for the Homeless

national coalition for the homelessThe National Coalition for the Homeless is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission: To prevent and end homelessness while ensuring the immediate needs of those experiencing homelessness are met and their civil rights protected.

We envision a world where everyone has a safe, decent, affordable and accessible home. We are committed to creating the systemic and attitudinal changes necessary to prevent and end homelessness. We take as our first principle of practice that people who are currently experiencing homelessness or have formerly experienced homelessness must be actively involved in all of our work. Our programs are centered around public education, policy advocacy, and grassroots organizing, and are focused on the issues of housing justice, economic justice, health care justice, and civil rights.

student mental illness lifeline

SMILe was formed in 2008 after its founder discovered that she was not the only one suffering in (relative) silence through University with mental illness. Students she talked to felt their universities didn’t want to admit their students were ‘unhappy’, especially in the long term, and that as students their vulnerability was overlooked.

One of the worst parts of mental illness is that it is so emotionally draining that looking and fighting for the help and support you need becomes almost impossible. SMILe was set up to make finding the right information and help easier. It is built on careful research and the personal experiences of mental illness sufferers from several universities.

We hope you find it helpful. Please get in touch if there is any information that you would like adding to the site or if you find a broken link that needs updating.