Make the Connection: Veterans Stories & Support

make the connectionIf you are a veteran, or a family member or a friend of a veteran and searching for help, you are not alone.  Through the US Department of Veterans Affairs, this website will offer you a plethora of help.  With connections through Facebook and through Youtube, not to mention videos onsite and self-assessments; this site is a very good place to visit when needing help that you earned.

There is also a free Veterans Crisis Line to call, a resource locator, and a very awesome site customizer.  You served our country, and served it selflessly.  Don’t let this site pass you by!

Center for Prevention of School Violence

centerfor the prevention of school violenceThe North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (NCDJJDP) has created a website to help stop school violence.  Finding out positive ways to deal with youth development for ALL youths can help curb some of the horrible violence that happens now.  Education is the best knowledge–the best way to help children understand that violence IS NOT the answer to issues in school.

The NCDJJDP has an alternative learning resource page with information about alternative learning, webcasts and resources about wanting to end the violence in schools, and a cafeteria page, dealing with nutrition and healthy eating.

There is a “question of the month” each month in the library which is very interesting to check out, and a parents resources and principals’ office.

The idea behind this website is that if every child can get a good, overall, balanced healthy school meal and school day while being treated fairly and responsibly, perhaps our days of school violence could be put behind us.  Wishful thinking perhaps, but one less school violence issue is well worth it, psychologically-wise as well as socially-wise.

National Coalition for the Homeless

national coalition for the homelessThe National Coalition for the Homeless is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission: To prevent and end homelessness while ensuring the immediate needs of those experiencing homelessness are met and their civil rights protected.

We envision a world where everyone has a safe, decent, affordable and accessible home. We are committed to creating the systemic and attitudinal changes necessary to prevent and end homelessness. We take as our first principle of practice that people who are currently experiencing homelessness or have formerly experienced homelessness must be actively involved in all of our work. Our programs are centered around public education, policy advocacy, and grassroots organizing, and are focused on the issues of housing justice, economic justice, health care justice, and civil rights.

Defeat Depression

defeat depressionDefeat Depression was started in July 2007 (by Hannah Dawnielle) for anyone suffering with mental illness. We’re always here to listen and lend a helping hand. You are NOT alone. Our hope is that you find DD to be a safe haven. Here you will NOT be judged. Feel free to speak your mind, just be kind when going about it.

Our Sponsor


American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children

The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, founded in 1987, is a nonprofit national organization focused on meeting the needs of professionals engaged in all aspects of services for maltreated children and their families. Especially important to APSAC is the dissemination of state-of-the-art practice in all professional disciplines related to child abuse and neglect.

Our Mission: The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children is the leading national organization supporting professionals who serve children and families affected by child maltreatment and violence. As a multidisciplinary group of professions, APSAC achieves its mission in a number of ways, most notably through expert training and educational activities, policy leadership and collaboration, and consultation that emphasizes theoretically sound, evidence-based principles.

Our Vision: APSAC envisions a world where all maltreated or at-risk children and their families have access to the highest level of professional commitment and service.

As a multidisciplinary group of professions, APSAC achieves its mission in a number of ways, most notably through expert training and educational activities, policy leadership and collaboration, and consultation that emphasizes theoretically sound, evidence-based principles.

APSAC is Strongly Committed to:

  • Preventing child maltreatment
  • Eliminating the recurrence of child maltreatment
  • Promoting research and guidelines to inform professional practice
  • Connecting professionals from the many disciplines to promote the best response to child maltreatment
  • Ensuring that America’s public policy concerning child maltreatment is well informed and constructive
  • Educating the public about child abuse and neglect

ISTSS: International Studies for Traumatic Stress Studies

ISTSS provides a forum for the sharing of research, clinical strategies, public policy concerns and theoretical formulations on trauma around the world. We are the premier society for the exchange of professional knowledge and expertise in the field.

Members of ISTSS include psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, counselors, researchers, administrators, advocates, journalists, clergy, and others with an interest in the study and treatment of traumatic stress.

ISTSS members come from a variety of clinical and non-clinical settings around the world, including public and private health facilities, private practice, universities, non-university research foundations and from many different cultural backgrounds.

Tourette Syndrome “PLUS”

This site is the work of Leslie E. Packer, PhD. Any articles on the site that are not authored by me are attributed to their respective authors and are used either with permission or because they are in the public domain or used under Creative Commons License.

I am a NYS-licensed psychologist who specializes in Tourette’s Syndrome and the associated conditions. After completing a doctorate in experimental psychology and working in academia teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in psychology, I left to go into applied clinical work at NYU Medical Center/Bellevue Hospital in the Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, where I applied my previous research in biofeedback and my background in behavioral psychology to treating patients with a variety of neurologically-based motor control problems, including movement disorders such as spasmodic torticollis and Tourette’s Syndrome.

For the past 28 years, I have been in private practice, the last 13 of which have been devoted to working with children and adolescents with TS+. Within that framework, my private practice has been split between providing psychotherapy for individuals have TS+ and serving as a consulting psychologist to school districts who need training and/or assistance in developing appropriate educational programs for students with TS+. In my psychotherapeutic work, I incorporate research-validated methods such as cognitive-behavior therapy and comprehensive behavioral interventions for tics (CBIT), as well as parent training. I also provide workshops for parents, educators, and clinicians who want to learn more about TS+.

This site represents more than just “book knowledge” or clinical experience, however. It also incorporates my experiences as a family member and pro bono advocate for the Tourette’s Syndrome community. As the parent of two young adults with TS+ and as the spouse of a man with TS+, I know some of the pain and challenges that family members face on a daily basis.

This web site is my way of sharing some of what I’ve learned personally and professionally in my journey over the past 21 years. If it helps another family, teacher, or colleague, I am delighted.

student mental illness lifeline

SMILe was formed in 2008 after its founder discovered that she was not the only one suffering in (relative) silence through University with mental illness. Students she talked to felt their universities didn’t want to admit their students were ‘unhappy’, especially in the long term, and that as students their vulnerability was overlooked.

One of the worst parts of mental illness is that it is so emotionally draining that looking and fighting for the help and support you need becomes almost impossible. SMILe was set up to make finding the right information and help easier. It is built on careful research and the personal experiences of mental illness sufferers from several universities.

We hope you find it helpful. Please get in touch if there is any information that you would like adding to the site or if you find a broken link that needs updating.