Losing Your Parents

Losing Your Parents

In her writing, she’s able to take the challenges she faces and turn them into a recipe which can be applied to every day life. In doing so, she knows that finding creative ways to move through tough emotions always leads to a better, healthier, happier, active, more adventurous life for herself. By writing honestly and openly, she hopes her direct experiences will inspire others to who are grieving to move forward in their lives.  Losing Your Parents confronts one of the hardest subjects for people to deal with, namely how to react in the face of a parent passing away. Blog posts on the site detail useful books to read, along with other useful grief resources.

Ask For Help

Ask For Help

About 1 in 4 Americans suffer from mental illness in any given year. It’s time we remove the stigma of asking for help. To start, we are providing resources and asking you to share your story so that we may help one another.  This site was created by Peter Rodgers, Eliot Rodgers father, the young man who killed six people and injured thirteen others in what was partially blamed on mental health issues.  It is Rodgers hope that others visit this site, use resources, share their stories and hopefully begin healing.

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.

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The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

Two young Swiss Psychiatrists, Christian Müller and Gaetano Benedetti, dissatisfied with the treatment of schizophrenia at the time, decided to gather together colleagues interested in the psychoanalytic treatment of schizophrenia. For the first 40 years of its existence the ISPS focused on organizing Symposiums every 3 years for clinicians to exchange ideas about their work. During these early years the ISPS acronym stood for the International Symposium for the Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia.

ISPS is an international organization promoting psychotherapy and psychological treatments for persons with psychosis. We are committed to advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders. We seek to achieve the best possible outcomes for service users by engaging in meaningful partnership with health professionals, service users, families and carers.

PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.

The Compassionate Friends

The Compassionate Friends

Year after year for nearly four decades, The Compassionate Friends has spread hope to more and more bereaved families. TCF has been widely recognized as a unique lifeline for those who are dealing with the tremendous grief that follows the death of a child. The organization has built this reputation in spite of struggling with the financial ups and downs that plague nearly all nonprofits.

From these financial struggles emerged the idea that a foundation might be created with the sole purpose of guaranteeing enough financial stability for The Compassionate Friends to always “be there” to provide emotional support to those who may see no hope. In 2000, thanks to the dedication and commitment of many members and friends of TCF, that dream came true with the creation of TCF Foundation.

While TCF Foundation has come a long way since its inception, there is still a long way to go before its mission can truly be reached. As a member of TCF or simply as a caring individual, you can support TCF Foundation through donations that can take many different forms.