Befrienders Worldwide

Befrienders Worldwide

Originally established in 1974 by Chad Varah (founder of the Samaritans), then recently launched as an independent charity in 2012, Befrienders Worldwide is a dynamic and expanding global network of 349 emotional support centers in 32 countries, spanning 5 continents. These centers are staffed by more than 25,000 volunteers who provide vital support to an estimated 7 million service users each year.

Befrienders Worldwide centers provide an open space for those in distress to talk and be heard. This is via telephone helplines, SMS messaging, face to face, internet chat, outreach and local partnerships.

We believe in giving a person the opportunity to explore feelings which can cause distress, the importance of being listened to, in confidence, anonymously, and without prejudice. We value that a person has the fundamental decision about their own life.

By embracing new technologies, sharing expertise and experiences, Befrienders Worldwide is committed to the vision of a world in which despair can be relieved and there are fewer deaths by suicide. To achieve this, we aim to: improve access to information about suicide and emotional support services worldwide; provide innovative support and services to the Befrienders Worldwide member centers and sustain and expand the Befrienders Worldwide global network of emotional support centers.




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Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Association

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Association

We discovered that problems do not happen all the time. Even the most chronic problems have periods or times when the difficulties do not occur or are less intense. By studying these times when problems are less severe or even absent, we discovered that people do many positive things that they are not fully aware of. By bringing these small successes into their awareness and repeating the successful things they do when the problem is less severe, people improve their lives and become more confident about themselves.

And, of course, there is nothing like experiencing small successes to help a person become more hopeful about themselves and their life. When they are more hopeful, they become more interested in creating a better life for themselves and their families. They become more hopeful about their future and want to achieve more.

Because these solutions appear occasionally and are already within the person, repeating these successful behaviors is easier than learning a whole new set of solutions that may have worked for someone else. Thus, the brief part was born. Since it takes less effort, people can readily become more eager to repeat the successful behaviors and make further changes.

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy has taken almost 30 years to develop into what it is today. It is simple to learn, but difficult to practice because our old learning gets in the way. The model continues to evolve and change. It is increasingly taken out of the therapy or counseling room and applied in a wide variety of settings where people want to get along or work together.




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WellSpouse

WellSpouse

The Well Spouse® Association, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) membership organization, advocates for and addresses the needs of individuals caring for a chronically ill and/or disabled spouse/partner.  We offer peer to peer support and educate health care professionals and the general public about the special challenges and unique issues “well” spouses face every day. To achieve this mission the Well Spouse® Association: coordinates a national network of Support Groups, facilitates a Mentor program, publishes a newsletter (Mainstay), hosts a website  with resources for coping and survival skills, which includes an on-line chat forum for spousal caregivers, organizes regional respite weekends and a national conference for caregivers, provides continuing support for members whose spouses have died, advocates on behalf of spousal caregivers and seeks out new initiatives to help caregiver spouses and their families cope with the emotional and financial stresses associated with chronic illness and/or disability.

 




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NAADAC The Association for Addiction Professionals

naadac

The addiction profession workforce is estimated at more than 85,000 individuals that include counselors, educators, and other addiction-focused health care professionals who specialize in addiction prevention, intervention, treatment, recovery support, and education.

Most addiction professionals are employed in the following industries: outpatient care centers; residential mental retardation, mental health and substance abuse facilities; individual and family services; local government; general medical and surgical hospitals; psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals; and private practice. Many other addiction professionals work in prisons, probation or parole agencies, juvenile detention facilities, halfway houses, detox centers and employee assistance programs.




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Life After Hate

Life After Hate

Based on our own powerful narratives of transformation and decades of experience in the extreme far-right, we support schools, community groups, NGOs, and other organizations that have a desire to understand, teach, heal, prevent, and counter racism and violent extremism in their communities.

We are engaged in academic research, with reputable partners, to understand individual-level pathways into and out of extremism.  This understanding enables us to develop strategies and solutions to counter violent extremism in its many forms.

Through our program ExitUSA, we help radicalized individuals disengage from extremist movements and begin the process of deradicalization.  Our own unique experiences position us in the best place possible to understand the challenges and support needed to assist those who want to leave, or who have already left an extremist movement on their own.  We also support community practitioners (counselors, social workers, faith leaders, etc.) and families who are working with individuals who have the desire to change.




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Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

The site is managed by a group of independent volunteers and contractors around the world – most of whom are either family members (with sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, or parents who have suffered from schizophrenia) or people who have schizophrenia. While most of our writers are students of psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience, for the most part we are not full-time working mental health professionals but we are very familiar with the disease both through direct personal experience and extensive reading on the topic.

We rely upon what we believe are good sources of scientifically accurate materials relating to schizophrenia and frequently consult with an ever growing group of schizophrenia researchers who act as unofficial advisors to the site.




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Association for Humanistic Psychology

Association for Humanistic Psychology

In the twenty-first century, the Association for Humanistic Psychology is committed to translating new knowledge and science into humanistic applications and approaches to further the wisdom, purpose, and consciousness of individuals and communities.  AHP seeks to influence other fields so that Humanistic Psychology becomes the lens through which humanity can understand and shape an evolving world.  When we comprehend how humanistic values and themes can impact new developments and world events, and vice versa, we are better able to promote growth, awareness, interdependence, and peace.




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Center for Autism and Related Disabilities at USF (CARD)

Center for Autism and Related Disabilities at USF (CARD)

CARD’s work includes:
Developing and disseminating materials. Our materials are available online and in hard copy.
Developing and distributing an online newsletter two times a year. On a monthly basis, we send our CARD Connector, an online blast with educational and informational content for folks on our mailing list.
Organizing and conducting local, regional and statewide training events. Each year, regional workshops are organized on topics of great interest to families and school personnel.
Maintaining an active website. Families and professionals often access the web to gather information. Our website links to information and resources about autism and related disabilities, provides a list of training events, and other valuable information. The website is updated on a regular basis. CARD-USF also distributes information through our Facebook page and Twitter.
Engaging in individual consultations. CARD-USF offers families and/or professionals strategies or information on best practices to increase skill development or address behavioral concerns by observing the individual in natural settings, and collaborating with the person’s team and family members to suggest appropriate services and supports. Once our staff has determined the individual needs of a child or adult with ASD, we may provide direct consultation in a home, school or community setting.




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