American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

AFSP is a multifaceted organization made up of esteemed scientists, dedicated survivors of suicide loss, people with mental disorders and their families, and an expansive network of business and community leaders.

We are at once a grassroots movement, a support network, an educator, a professional research organization and a grant-making foundation. We organize hundreds of events in communities across the country, raising millions of dollars each year to support our work, both locally and nationally. We advocate for social change, supporting policies that contribute to reducing and preventing suicides nationwide. While AFSP does not provide direct services, such as counseling or running a crisis hotline, we do work closely with the organizations providing these services. Through these many roles, we reach hundreds of thousands of people every year. Increasingly, the media has turned to AFSP as their go-to source of expertise on suicide and its prevention. In collaboration with our volunteers and program participants, the following people help to make all of these things happen. To fully achieve its mission, AFSP engages in the following Five Core Strategies:

  • Fund scientific research
  • Offer educational programs for professionals
  • Educate the public about mood disorders and suicide prevention
  • Promote policies and legislation that impact suicide and prevention
  • Provide programs and resources for survivors of suicide loss and people at risk, and involve them in the work of the Foundation.

 

CDC WISQARS

CDC WISQARS

CDC’s WISQARS™ (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) is an interactive, online database that provides fatal and nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost of injury data from a variety of trusted sources. Researchers, the media, public health professionals, and the public can use WISQARS™ data to learn more about the public health and economic burden associated with unintentional and violence-related injury in the United States.

Users can search, sort, and view the injury data and create reports, charts, and maps based on the following:

  • Intent of injury (unintentional injury, violence-related, homicide/assault, legal intervention, suicide/intentional self-harm)
  • Mechanism (cause) of injury (e.g., fall, fire, firearm, motor vehicle crash, poisoning, suffocation)
  • Body region (e.g., traumatic brain injury, spinal cord, torso, upper and lower extremities)
  • Nature (type) of injury (e.g., fracture, dislocation, internal injury, open wound, amputation, and burn)
  • Geographic location (national, regional, state)
  • Sex, race/ethnicity, and age of the injured person

Crisis Text Line

Crisis Text Line

We are here for you, anonymously, when you want to text us and talk about what you are feeling, what is going on and what is possibly upsetting you.
We fight for the texter. Our first priority is helping people move from a hot moment to a cool calm, guiding them to create a plan to stay safe and healthy. YOU are our first priority.
Great crisis counseling requires great crisis counselors. It is on us to provide a platform that allows our specialists to do their best possible work. We’re proud that our platform is stable and very easy to use. And, while we love data and data science, we believe in a human centric approach. (Read: we don’t think robots make great crisis counselors.)

 

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.

Our Sponsor


Open to Hope

Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a non-profit organization with the mission of helping people find hope after loss. We invite you to read, listen, and share your stories of hope and compassion.    This website helps people to learn how to grieve and recover after a tragic event such as a death in the family.  It is important to grieve and let others know how you feel.  Life is too short to let others pass without letting them know how you feel!

National Center for PTSD

National Center for PTSD The mission of the National Center for PTSD is to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s Veterans and others who have experienced trauma, or who suffer from PTSD, through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s mission is:

To advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The Center was created within the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1989, in response to a Congressional mandate to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD. “Advancing science and promoting understanding of traumatic stress” is the Center’s goal.

In 1995, the National Center created a website. Since September 11th, website usage has grown considerably, and in fiscal year 2006 the site had over 1 million unique users! The website strives to provide current, valid, professional information on a range of topics related to trauma and stress. The site is separated into sections each for one of a variety of audiences, including veterans and their families, clinicians, health care providers, researchers, and others who have or know someone who has experienced a trauma.

The website currently contains more than 1,600 documents, several newsletters you can subscribe to, extensive Web Resource links, and much more:

  • 140 fact sheets
  • 800 downloadable articles
  • Videos for veterans and their families, and for clinicians
  • PTSD 101: a series of expert lectures on PTSD
  • The PILOTS database (the largest interdisciplinary index to the worldwide literature on traumatic stress)
  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide
  • Information for disaster recovery including the Psychological First Aid manual

There & Back

There & Back

There & Back Again is a non-profit reintegration program offered at no cost to veterans of all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Because of their combat service abroad, many veterans return home with a myriad of complex emotional issues, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). TABA offers a structured program of yoga, meditation and alternative approaches to healing the whole body to help veterans transition back to their lives stateside.

Our objective is teach veterans how to use breath awareness, meditation and yoga to manage their symptoms of PTSD, to improve their relationships with loved ones, to begin to fully participate in their lives, and to give back to their fellow veterans through TABA’s Train the Trainer program. TABA is comprised of respected professionals who are dedicated to the healing of our military men and women, and our program is based on both the latest research on the benefits of alternative therapies and staff and advisory board members’ personal successes managing symptoms of PTSD.

A multifaceted approach to wellness, including yoga, Reiki, acupuncture, meditation and other alternative therapies help empower veterans to manage their own challenges of reintegration.

There & Back Again incorporates a whole body approach to wellness.  Recognizing the three parts of our “self” – our mind/thoughts, our physical body and our emotional/spiritual self.  A combat experience is an extreme experience that can disconnect us from one or all of aspects of our “self.”  There & Back Again provides Veterans an opportunity to reconnect and reintegrate all parts of their “self.”

Many Veterans have found that these tools, along with traditional therapies, help them manage their challenges better allowing them to fully participate in their lives.

1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.