Dementia Is In The House

Dementia Is In The House

You’re here because someone you love, quite possibly one of your parents, suffers from an illness that differs from anything you’ve ever experienced. Other serious diseases, such as cancer, tend to affect patients physically; in that case it can be easier for you to see and understand the changes. But when the illness resides in the brain, everything is a mystery. Knowing what’s happening – and what you can do to help – can make a painful challenge in life a little easier.

It’s important to remember that while much confusion may surround the exact naming of your loved one’s disease, the label is far less important than the actions you can take to reduce your loss. There’s a lot you can do to help yourself and your family throughout this time.




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Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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The Pacific Institute

The Pacific InstituteThe Pacific Institute® was co-founded by Lou and Diane Tice in 1971 in Seattle, Washington. After a period of rapid growth, in 1980 we expanded beyond the U.S. and Canada. To date we’ve served clients in over 60 countries and 22 languages.

Our educational programs have evolved over the years to leverage new formats and technologies; however their core principles remain the same. We’re steadfastly committed to empowering organizations and individuals to free themselves from self-imposed limitations, improve performance, and reach their full potential.

Over the past four decades our work has driven significant transformation, helping to establish infrastructure in post-apartheid South Africa and to foster peaceful discussions in Northern Ireland; empowering the education sector of Guatemala and the Mo tribe of Ghana; guiding Fortune 1000 companies down a path toward better productivity; and leading Olympic athletes to victory.




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The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.




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Open to Hope

Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a non-profit organization with the mission of helping people find hope after loss. We invite you to read, listen, and share your stories of hope and compassion.    This website helps people to learn how to grieve and recover after a tragic event such as a death in the family.  It is important to grieve and let others know how you feel.  Life is too short to let others pass without letting them know how you feel!




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Violence unSilenced

Violence unSilenced

Violence UnSilenced is a resource site that has been fostered by a community of rape, domestic violence, childhood abuse survivors and personal bloggers. Formerly a non-profit organization guided by a board of directors, the site is now maintained by Violence UnSilenced founder, journalist Maggie Ginsberg. From 2008–2104, the Violence UnSilenced project published personal accounts of interpersonal violence, giving voice to over many hundreds of survivor stories. The project is no longer accepting new submissions or comments, but it still offers access to the existing body of stories to stand as powerful, collaborative testimonial that honors survivors everywhere. Please continue to read, to speak out, and to support one another.




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National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.




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Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.




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