Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.

Faith Trust Institute

Faith Trust Institute

FaithTrust is there to help when a person is worried about what to do when they are in an abusive situation and worried about crossing religious and cultural mores.  They have different religions listed, and are very willing to help!  It is important for the person in the abusive situation to leave as soon as possible, and this website will help them feel more comfortable doing so.

National Alliance for Grieving Children

National Alliance for Grieving Children

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) provides a network for nationwide communication between hundreds of  professionals and volunteers who want to share ideas, information and resources with each other to better support the grieving children and families they serve in their own communities. Through this network, the NAGC offers online education, hosts an annual symposium on children’s grief, maintains a national data base of children’s bereavement support programs and promotes national awareness to enhance public sensitivity to the issues impacting grieving children and teens.

Located on this website is grants, symposiums, memberships, blogs, RSS feeds, activities, resources, discussions and support.

Losing Your Parents

Losing Your Parents

In her writing, she’s able to take the challenges she faces and turn them into a recipe which can be applied to every day life. In doing so, she knows that finding creative ways to move through tough emotions always leads to a better, healthier, happier, active, more adventurous life for herself. By writing honestly and openly, she hopes her direct experiences will inspire others to who are grieving to move forward in their lives.  Losing Your Parents confronts one of the hardest subjects for people to deal with, namely how to react in the face of a parent passing away. Blog posts on the site detail useful books to read, along with other useful grief resources.

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Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

The Psych Files

The Psych Files

Dr. Michael Britt keeps up to date on current psychology through video and podcasts.  The Psych Files is a Psychology podcast hosted by Michael A. Britt, Ph.D. The Psych Files is aimed at anyone curious about human behavior, though students taking a course in psychology, those majoring in psychology, and instructors of psychology will find the podcast particularly of interest.

Some facts about the podcast:

    • The premier academic Psychology Podcast since January 2007.
    • Always in the top 10 of the iTunes Higher Education category.
    • Each episode is downloaded more than 20,000 times.
    • Over 4,500 episodes are downloaded every day. Total downloads for all the episodes are over 9 million worldwide.
    • This website is linked to by thousands of high schools, colleges and universities around the world.
    • Typical listeners are college students and their professors, critical thinkers and life-long learners.

 

    • There are currently 7 apps in the Apple app store and 3 in the Google Android market which have grown out of the work here on this podcast.

 

International Positive Psychology Association

International Positive Psychology Association

Positive psychology is an exciting new field of inquiry that has captured the interest of thousands of researchers, practitioners, and students from around the world. This burgeoning area of psychology focuses on the study and practice of the positive emotions, strengths, and virtues that make individuals and institutions thrive. Since its inception in 1998, the field has seen an investment of tens of millions of dollars in research, the founding of several scientific journals, the development of masters, and Ph.D. programs in key universities, and reports in major news outlets (including cover stories in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News & World Report). In addition, the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) – in just four years of existence – has grown to thousands of members from 80 countries!

IPPA has several related missions. First, IPPA wants to further the science of positive psychology across the globe and to ensure that the field continues to rest on this science. Second, IPPA wants to work for the effective and responsible application of positive psychology in diverse areas such as organizational psychology, counseling and clinical psychology, business, health, education, and coaching. The third mission of the organization is to foster education and training in the field. In all of these endeavors, we want to create rigorous standards for positive psychology, so that the field always represents the very best levels of current knowledge.

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.