International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)

International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)

Founded in 1979, the International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA) is a global network of people concerned about psychological manipulation and abuse in cultic or high-demand groups, alternative movements, and other environments. ICSA is tax-exempt, supports civil liberties, and is not affiliated with any religious or commercial organizations.

ICSA is unique in how it brings together former group members, families, helping professionals and researchers.

ICSA’s mission is to apply research and professional perspectives to:

Help former members of cultic and other high-control environments

Provide guidance and support to families of people involved in high-control environments

Educate the public about psychological manipulation and the harmful effects of high-control environments

Encourage, support, and conduct research to advance understanding of psychological manipulation and high-control environments

And Support helping professionals interested in this area.




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BDP Central

BDP Central

Being a borderline feels like eternal hell. Nothing less. Pain, anger, confusion, never knowing how I’m gonna feel from one minute to the next. Hurting because I hurt those whom I love. Feeling misunderstood. Nothing gives me pleasure. Wanting to die but not being able to kill myself because I’d feel too much guilt for those I’d hurt, and then feeling angry about that so I cut myself or take an overdose to make all the feelings go away.

Some assumptions about BPD may include:

I must be loved by all the important people in my life always or else I am worthless. I must be completely competent in all ways to be a worthwhile person.

Some people are good and everything about them is perfect. Other people are thoroughly bad and should be severely blamed and punished for it.

My feelings are always caused by external events. I have no control over my emotions or the things I do in reaction to them.

Nobody cares about me as much as I care about them, so I always lose everyone I care about-despite the desperate things I try to do to stop them from leaving me.

If someone treats me badly, then I become bad.

When I am alone, I become nobody and nothing.

I will be happy only when I can find an all-giving, perfect person to love me and take care of me no matter what.

But if someone close to this loves me, then something must be wrong with them.

I can’t stand the frustration that I feel when I need something from someone and I can’t get it. I’ve got to do something to make it go away.




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National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD)

National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD)

The Mission of NEA-BPD is to provide education, raise public awareness and understanding, decrease stigma, promote research and enhance the quality of life of those affected by Borderline Personality Disorder.

NEA.BPD works with families and persons in recovery, raises public awareness, provides education to professionals, promotes research, and works with Congress to enhance the quality of life for those affected by this serious but treatable mental illness.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a serious psychological and psychosocial disorder where people have extreme difficulties regulating their emotions. Problems include intense and volatile emotions (such as shame, anger, sadness or anxiety), chaotic relationships, impulsivity, unstable sense of self, suicide attempts, self-harm, fears of abandonment, and chronic feelings of emptiness.With effective treatment and support, data show that most people with BPD can make great progress, with important gains even in one year across a variety of problem areas. Many will no longer meet criteria for BPD. Similarly, data show that with help, family members also report big reductions in grief and feelings of burden, as well as an increased sense of mastery and family satisfaction. Over time, 80% of BPD sufferers reduce their symptoms.

 




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Dementia Is In The House

Dementia Is In The House

You’re here because someone you love, quite possibly one of your parents, suffers from an illness that differs from anything you’ve ever experienced. Other serious diseases, such as cancer, tend to affect patients physically; in that case it can be easier for you to see and understand the changes. But when the illness resides in the brain, everything is a mystery. Knowing what’s happening – and what you can do to help – can make a painful challenge in life a little easier.

It’s important to remember that while much confusion may surround the exact naming of your loved one’s disease, the label is far less important than the actions you can take to reduce your loss. There’s a lot you can do to help yourself and your family throughout this time.




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Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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The Pacific Institute

The Pacific InstituteThe Pacific Institute® was co-founded by Lou and Diane Tice in 1971 in Seattle, Washington. After a period of rapid growth, in 1980 we expanded beyond the U.S. and Canada. To date we’ve served clients in over 60 countries and 22 languages.

Our educational programs have evolved over the years to leverage new formats and technologies; however their core principles remain the same. We’re steadfastly committed to empowering organizations and individuals to free themselves from self-imposed limitations, improve performance, and reach their full potential.

Over the past four decades our work has driven significant transformation, helping to establish infrastructure in post-apartheid South Africa and to foster peaceful discussions in Northern Ireland; empowering the education sector of Guatemala and the Mo tribe of Ghana; guiding Fortune 1000 companies down a path toward better productivity; and leading Olympic athletes to victory.




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The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.




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Open to Hope

Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a non-profit organization with the mission of helping people find hope after loss. We invite you to read, listen, and share your stories of hope and compassion.    This website helps people to learn how to grieve and recover after a tragic event such as a death in the family.  It is important to grieve and let others know how you feel.  Life is too short to let others pass without letting them know how you feel!




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