Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Founded in 1936, SPSSI is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields and others who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of important social and policy issues. In various ways, SPSSI seeks to bring theory and practice into focus on human problems of the group, the community, and nations, as well as the increasingly important problems that have no national boundaries.

SPSSI affords social and behavioral scientists opportunities to apply their knowledge and insights to the critical problems of today’s world.

SPSSI fosters and funds research on social issues through annual awards and programs of small research grants and disseminates research findings through its scholarly journals, sponsored books, specialized conferences, and its convention programs.

With headquarters in Washington, DC, the Society influences public policy through its publications and the advocacy efforts of its members, fellows, and staff.

SPSSI encourages public education and social activism on social issues and facilitates information exchange through its newsletter and electronic dsicussion groups.

The Society’s mission is extended to the global arena by a team of representatives who cover developments at UN headquarters in New York and Geneva. SPSSI has been represented at the United Nations as a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) since 1987. SPSSI serves as consultant to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

An independent society, SPSSI is also Division 9 of the American Psychological Association (APA) and an organizational affiliate of the American Psychological Society (APS). SPSSI members are not required to be members of APA or APS. We welcome the membership of anyone interested in the Society.




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National Institutes of Mental Health

National Institutes of Mental Health

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the lead Federal agency for research on mental illnesses. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.
The urgency of this mission arises from the public health burden. According to recent estimates, mental illnesses account for 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability in the United States. An estimated 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI) in which the ability to function in daily life is significantly impaired. Those with SMI die 10 years earlier than individuals in the general population, on average. Furthermore, over 41,149 Americans die each year from suicide, more than twice the annual mortality from homicide or AIDS. Beyond the morbidity and mortality, a conservative estimate places the direct and indirect financial costs associated with mental illnesses in the United States at well over $300 billion annually. Mental illnesses rank as the third most costly medical conditions in terms of overall health care expenditure, behind heart conditions and traumatic injury.




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CDC WISQARS

CDC WISQARS

CDC’s WISQARS™ (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) is an interactive, online database that provides fatal and nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost of injury data from a variety of trusted sources. Researchers, the media, public health professionals, and the public can use WISQARS™ data to learn more about the public health and economic burden associated with unintentional and violence-related injury in the United States.

Users can search, sort, and view the injury data and create reports, charts, and maps based on the following:

  • Intent of injury (unintentional injury, violence-related, homicide/assault, legal intervention, suicide/intentional self-harm)
  • Mechanism (cause) of injury (e.g., fall, fire, firearm, motor vehicle crash, poisoning, suffocation)
  • Body region (e.g., traumatic brain injury, spinal cord, torso, upper and lower extremities)
  • Nature (type) of injury (e.g., fracture, dislocation, internal injury, open wound, amputation, and burn)
  • Geographic location (national, regional, state)
  • Sex, race/ethnicity, and age of the injured person



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Psysci.co

Psysci.co

psysci examines the latest research as well as discussion of topical stories, concerning the areas of psychology and science that contribute to our understanding of health and well-being.

We aim to take an evidence based, objective viewpoint on the topics being discussed.

There are popular posts, blogs and email updates as well, about psychology and science updates for this interesting website.




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Our Sponsor


Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.




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Society for the Teaching Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology

Society for the Teaching Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology

From Division 2 of the American Psychological Association, Society for the Teaching of Psychology, there are many resources that can help instructors, students, and just psychologists who do not have a classroom in which to work.  From Abnormal to Statistics, Research and Teaching, there are a myriad of resources, handouts, and PowerPoints that anyone can use better understand the process of psychology.

 




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The APA Youtube’s Channel

11 youtube

The American Psychological Association’s Youtube’s Channel includes videos of the ever popular, “This is Psychology” from the APA President, discussions about research methodologies, tutorial videos, training videos and many more instructional and informational videos.

While this at first seems set up for the APA member, anyone can benefit from most of the videos included.  Highly worth a visit!




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The Observer

The Observer

Published 10 times per year by the Association for Psychological Science, the Observer educates and informs the Association on matters affecting the research, academic, and applied disciplines of psychology; promotes the scientific values of APS Members; reports and comments on issues of national interest to the psychological scientist community; and provides a vehicle for the dissemination of information on APS.  For Non-Members, you may pay a short-time usage fee, or become a member.  For members of the APS, you log in with your account, and you can automatically read the Observer.




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