Suicidal No More

Suicidal No More

Suicidal No More: Choosing to Live with Schizoaffective Disorder is a blog by author, public speaker, and NAMI advocate Jennifer Robinson, who discusses her personal struggles and triumphs living with a serious mental illness that involves both psychosis and the symptoms of bipolar disorder. She provides coping tips, resources for people who are experiencing suicidal ideation, suggestions for reaching out for help, and information on what life is like for people who live with serious and persistent mental illnesses. This blog has been online for ten years, and since then Jennifer has co-authored the book Episodes of Schizophrenia, and been published in the anthology Parts Unbound: Narratives on Mental Illness and Health.




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The Brain from Top to Bottom

The Brain from Top to Bottom

The Brain From Top To Bottom is an expanding archive of information at McGill University (Montreal) on brain basics, brain & mind, and brain disorders. The text is available in French and English and on three levels. The site can be browsed by topic, level of explanation, level of organization (social, psychological, neurological, cellular, and molecular), five leveled modules, and guided tours.




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Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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Symptom Media

Symptom Media

Symptom Media is an online mental health education and training film library available via subscription streaming. Symptom Media’s library of over 300 mental health simulations including a DSM 5 and ICD Guided Film Collection and Assessment Tools provide viewers with training tools critical for symptom recognition. These innovative films offer visual guideposts to better understand what a particular mental health diagnosis looks like and decreases the stigma for those facing psychological issues. Ranging from 30 seconds to 15 minutes, the films are currently integrated into training courses, individual and group therapy sessions, lectures, and other educational formats across the country.

About Us – Symptom Media’s behavioral health clinical training titles are guided by the DSM, incorporating the symptoms into a concise vignette that promotes critical thinking, allows for discussion and analysis of symptoms that creates the optimal learning experience.

Symptom Media’s unique training titles offer visual guideposts to show you how a clinical diagnosis looks, incorporating all the symptoms into a single vignette.

 




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Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation is committed to alleviating the suffering caused by mental illness by awarding grants that will lead to advances and breakthroughs in scientific research.

100% of all donor contributions for research are invested in NARSAD GRANTS leading to discoveries in understanding causes and improving treatments of disorders in children and adults, such as depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, autism, and bipolar, attention-deficit hyperactivity, post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

Over a quarter of a century, we have awarded over $328 million worldwide to more than 3,700 scientists carefully selected by our prestigious Scientific Council.

Our vision:
To bring the joy of living to those affected by mental illness – those who are ill and their loved ones.

Our values:
What we believe:

  • Better treatments and breakthroughs come from scientific discovery.
  • Only fund scientists whose research is reviewed and recommended by a world-renowned Scientific Council including Nobel prize winners and chairs of psychiatric departments.
  • 100% of contributions for research go directly to research. Costs for administration and fund raising are underwritten by outside grants.
  • Our financial operations must be transparent. Those who manage our Foundation must be committed to honesty and integrity.
  • Strategic partnerships that further our mission will be developed with transparency.



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Real Warriors

Real Warriors

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.

To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive website, mobile website and social media. The campaign features stories of real service members who reached out for psychological support or care with successful outcomes, including learning coping skills, maintaining their security clearance and continuing to succeed in their military or civilian careers. These Real Warriors are proving through example that reaching out is a sign of strength that benefits the entire military community.

In addition, the campaign encourages use of the DCoE Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.




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To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

It’s been nine years since Jamie posted the original TWLOHA story online, and we’re still here. We’re still working to let people know that hope is real and that they can get the help they deserve. Your story is important.

This began in the spring of 2006, when To Write Love on Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story about a friend struggling with depression, addiction, and self- injury. The words and the life it represented shed light on the reality of contrast—pain and peace, addiction and sobriety, regret and freedom. The title, “To Write Love on Her Arms,” also represented a goal—to believe that a better life was possible. A MySpace page was created to give the story a home, and T-shirts were sold to pay for the friend’s treatment.

As the days passed and the blog was shared, it became clear that this story was not just about one person. We heard from people longing to lift the heavy weight of depression, to be free from addiction or self-injury, to stay alive and live fully. We also heard from people mourning those they’d lost to such struggles, asking what they could do to bring hope to their communities. We learned that two out of three people who struggle with depression never seek help, and that untreated depression is the leading cause of suicide. In America alone, it’s estimated that 19 million people live with depression, and suicide is the third-leading cause of death among those 15-24 years old. It seemed we had stumbled into a bigger story, a conversation that needed to be had. These are issues of humanity, problems of pain that affect millions of people around the world, regardless of age, race, gender, religious belief, orientation, and background.

Over the years, TWLOHA has become much more than a blog and a T-shirt. Through musician support, tours, and social media, the message of hope and help has reached an audience broader than we could have ever anticipated. We’ve expanded from a computer screen to conferences, campuses, programs, and events around the country and the world, where we challenge the stigma and stereotypes that have surrounded mental health issues for so long. And we’re investing into treatment and recovery, offering financial support to organizations, centers, and individuals laboring in the priceless work of healing.

TWLOHA is honored to be a part of this continuing story, to invite people into the conversation, and to be a bridge to the better life we continue to believe is possible.




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National Center for PTSD

National Center for PTSD The mission of the National Center for PTSD is to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s Veterans and others who have experienced trauma, or who suffer from PTSD, through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s mission is:

To advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The Center was created within the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1989, in response to a Congressional mandate to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD. “Advancing science and promoting understanding of traumatic stress” is the Center’s goal.

In 1995, the National Center created a website. Since September 11th, website usage has grown considerably, and in fiscal year 2006 the site had over 1 million unique users! The website strives to provide current, valid, professional information on a range of topics related to trauma and stress. The site is separated into sections each for one of a variety of audiences, including veterans and their families, clinicians, health care providers, researchers, and others who have or know someone who has experienced a trauma.

The website currently contains more than 1,600 documents, several newsletters you can subscribe to, extensive Web Resource links, and much more:

  • 140 fact sheets
  • 800 downloadable articles
  • Videos for veterans and their families, and for clinicians
  • PTSD 101: a series of expert lectures on PTSD
  • The PILOTS database (the largest interdisciplinary index to the worldwide literature on traumatic stress)
  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide
  • Information for disaster recovery including the Psychological First Aid manual



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