National Institutes of Mental Health

National Institutes of Mental Health

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the lead Federal agency for research on mental illnesses. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.
The urgency of this mission arises from the public health burden. According to recent estimates, mental illnesses account for 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability in the United States. An estimated 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI) in which the ability to function in daily life is significantly impaired. Those with SMI die 10 years earlier than individuals in the general population, on average. Furthermore, over 41,149 Americans die each year from suicide, more than twice the annual mortality from homicide or AIDS. Beyond the morbidity and mortality, a conservative estimate places the direct and indirect financial costs associated with mental illnesses in the United States at well over $300 billion annually. Mental illnesses rank as the third most costly medical conditions in terms of overall health care expenditure, behind heart conditions and traumatic injury.




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American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology

American Society of Clinical PsychopharmacologyThe American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology is headquartered in the United States and has meetings three times a year.  It also has a journal, The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, and also has developed a Model Curriculum in Psychology, now in its’ 7th adaptation.  There are also resources and a clinical trial workshop as well.




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Moodletter

Moodletter

The information in Moodletter is for those living with these illnesses and their family members, friends, employers and co-workers, as well as mental health professionals. Others who want to live happier and healthier lives will also find articles of interest.  The information on Moodletter is provided to augment your relationship with your medical professional, not replace it. The better informed we are, the better we can help our medical professionals help us.




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Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.



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PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.




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PsychoTube

PsychoTube

Free psychology videos dealing with a myriad of topics, from Mood Disorders to Cognitive Behavioral Therapies to Anxiety Disorders.  Also listed are clinical psychology, developmental psychology, therapy, learning psychology, cognitive psychology, memory and other forms of psychotherapies.  Psychotube is a new way to share video and audio clips with other psychology teachers.
Many psychology teachers use short video and audio clips to facilitate their teaching of psychology and this site provides a way of organizing these clips.

 

The majority of these videos are Youtube or TED talks, but are very interesting and well worth the views!  You may subscribe, view the amazingly full dictionary, or glossary or of course, view the videos!




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student mental illness lifeline

SMILe was formed in 2008 after its founder discovered that she was not the only one suffering in (relative) silence through University with mental illness. Students she talked to felt their universities didn’t want to admit their students were ‘unhappy’, especially in the long term, and that as students their vulnerability was overlooked.

One of the worst parts of mental illness is that it is so emotionally draining that looking and fighting for the help and support you need becomes almost impossible. SMILe was set up to make finding the right information and help easier. It is built on careful research and the personal experiences of mental illness sufferers from several universities.

We hope you find it helpful. Please get in touch if there is any information that you would like adding to the site or if you find a broken link that needs updating.




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Emergency Mental Health Educational Manual

This manual is written by the University of British Columbia, however; there are many facets here that will provide useful to those of us in the States. Mostly interesting to the the common layperson who is interested in psychology/psychiatry or the student, this manual is a well-thought out guide to how to help others when help is needed right now.




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