No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

Center for Deployment Psychology

Center for Deployment Psychology

In honor of those of you who served our country and in honor of the United States Veterans Day, November 11th, I have decided to post this very awesome resource–the Center for Deployment Psychology.

The CDP mission is to prepare health care professionals to better meet the deployment-related emotional and psychological needs of military personnel and their families. More than two million service members have deployed during the conflicts overseas, including many who have deployed multiple times. With these increased deployments, service members and their families undergo increased stress and psychological health challenges.

To meet its mission, CDP trains health care professionals through live presentations, online learning resources, ongoing consultation and state-of-the-art education, coordinating activities across a nationwide network of training sites at 11 military medical centers.

Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.

MindYourMind

 MindYourMind

These resources are designed to reduce the stigma associated with mental illness and increase access and use of community support, both professional and peer-based.

Through the use of active engagement, best practice and technology, MindYourMind inspires youth to reach out, get help and give help.

This site has tips for when you are in crisis, need help, creating wellness for yourself, facts about all kinds of mental illness, fun interactive apps and games, personal expressions, interviews and ways to get involved and help others.

Our Sponsor


Ask For Help

Ask For Help

About 1 in 4 Americans suffer from mental illness in any given year. It’s time we remove the stigma of asking for help. To start, we are providing resources and asking you to share your story so that we may help one another.  This site was created by Peter Rodgers, Eliot Rodgers father, the young man who killed six people and injured thirteen others in what was partially blamed on mental health issues.  It is Rodgers hope that others visit this site, use resources, share their stories and hopefully begin healing.

The Other OCD

The Other OCD

This site discusses those strange, bizarre and disturbing OCD thoughts, sometimes called Purely Obsessional Compulsive Disorder (or “Pure-O”).  Things like:  “Is that cop following me?”, “Is my breathing weird?”, or “Have I hurt someone and not known it?”

Most people consider the whole OCD issue, but this group has mainly just the obsessions and hardly any of the compulsions.

This website also includes help for family and friends, books and articles, downloadable audio, and information for therapists.

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.