The Jung Page

The Jung Page

Carl Jung was one of the creators of modern depth psychology, which seeks to facilitate a conversation with the unconscious energies which move through each of us. He contributed many ideas which continue to inform contemporary life: complex, archetype, persona, shadow, anima and animus, personality typology, dream interpretation, individuation, and many other ideas. He had a deep appreciation of our creative life and considered spirituality a central part of the human journey. His method of interpretation of symbolic expression not only deepens our understanding of personal material, opening the psychodynamics of our personal biographies and dreams, but the deeper, collective patterns which develop within culture as well. In his memoir, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Jung wrote that meaning comes when people feel they are living the symbolic life, that they are actors in the divine drama. That gives the only meaning to human life; everything else is banal and you can dismiss it. A career, producing of children, are all maya (illusion) compared to that one thing, that your life is meaningful.




advertisement

 

EPsych

EPsych

Welcome to the worlds of ePsych. This exotic place is devoted to the study of psychology, the science of behavior and the mind. I am Brasha-san and, like you, am a student of psychology. Although I have studied the subject for many years, I still find it complicated, bewildering, confusing, maddening, at times even unbelievable. But psychology is also wonderful, beautiful, and glorious!

Without a doubt, psychology is the most personal of all the sciences. It is the science of you and me and all the other people and creatures we interact with throughout our lives. When you learn about psychology, you will discover how people are able to perform seemingly impossible activities with ease, and why they sometimes stumble on the simplest of tasks.

 




advertisement

 

California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT)

California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT)

CAMFT (California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists) is an independent professional organization of approximately 32,000 members representing the interests of licensed marriage and family therapists. It is dedicated to advancing the profession as an art and a science, to maintaining high standards of professional ethics, to upholding the qualifications for the profession and to expanding the recognition and awareness of the profession.

CAMFT is an independent, state professional organization and is not affiliated with any other organization (such as AAMFT) other than its chartered chapters in various locations throughout California.

CAMFT activities revolve around two interrelated themes: the advancement of marriage and family therapy as an art, a science and a mental health profession, and the advancement of the common business interests of its members.

CAMFT is your organizational advocate and representative. We monitor and work cooperatively with your regulatory board (BBS), the state legislature and others. We sponsor bills and get laws passed to benefit you and the public.

CAMFT like other professional or trade associations, is a special interest group. We believe that our special interests are good, both for us and for the public, and we are committed to actively and effectively pursuing those interests.

Take this opportunity to contribute to your profession. Show your commitment and invest in your future! Join with over 32,000 CAMFT members and help us carry on the work that strengthens the profession. If we are to continue to realize such benefits as insurance reimbursement, we must remain united. Joining CAMFT is truly a wise investment.




advertisement

 

The Freud Museum London

The Freud Museum London

The Freud Museum, at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, was the home of Sigmund Freud and his family when they escaped Austria following the Nazi annexation in 1938. It remained the family home until Anna Freud, the youngest daughter, died in 1982. The centerpiece of the museum is Freud’s study, preserved just as it was during his lifetime.

It contains Freud’s remarkable collection of antiquities: Egyptian; Greek; Roman and Oriental. Almost 2,000 items fill cabinets and are arranged on every surface. There are rows of ancient figures on the desk where Freud wrote until the early hours of the morning. The walls are lined with shelves containing Freud’s large library.

The house is also filled with memories of his daughter, Anna, who lived there for 44 years and continued to develop her pioneering psychoanalytic work, especially with children. It was her wish that the house become a museum to honor her illustrious father. The Freuds were fortunate to be able to bring all their furniture and household effects to London. These included splendid Biedermeier chests, tables and cupboards, and a fine collection of 18th and 19th century Austrian painted country furniture.

Undoubtedly the most famous piece of furniture in all the collection is Freud’s psychoanalytic couch, on which all of his patients reclined. The couch is remarkably comfortable and is covered with a richly colored Iranian rug with chenille cushions piled on top. Other fine Oriental rugs, Heriz and Tabriz, cover the floor and tables.




advertisement

 

Advertisement


Society for Personality Assessment

Society for Personality Assessment

The Society for Personality Assessment is dedicated to the development of methods of personality assessment, the advancement of research on their effectiveness, the exchange of ideas about the theory and practice of assessment and the promotion of the applied practice of personality assessment.

With 1500 international members, we are the largest organization in the world with this focus. Our membership is varied and includes clinicians in private practice, forensic assessors, researchers in private and public settings and educators in academic settings.




advertisement

 

BDP Central

BDP Central

Being a borderline feels like eternal hell. Nothing less. Pain, anger, confusion, never knowing how I’m gonna feel from one minute to the next. Hurting because I hurt those whom I love. Feeling misunderstood. Nothing gives me pleasure. Wanting to die but not being able to kill myself because I’d feel too much guilt for those I’d hurt, and then feeling angry about that so I cut myself or take an overdose to make all the feelings go away.

Some assumptions about BPD may include:

I must be loved by all the important people in my life always or else I am worthless. I must be completely competent in all ways to be a worthwhile person.

Some people are good and everything about them is perfect. Other people are thoroughly bad and should be severely blamed and punished for it.

My feelings are always caused by external events. I have no control over my emotions or the things I do in reaction to them.

Nobody cares about me as much as I care about them, so I always lose everyone I care about-despite the desperate things I try to do to stop them from leaving me.

If someone treats me badly, then I become bad.

When I am alone, I become nobody and nothing.

I will be happy only when I can find an all-giving, perfect person to love me and take care of me no matter what.

But if someone close to this loves me, then something must be wrong with them.

I can’t stand the frustration that I feel when I need something from someone and I can’t get it. I’ve got to do something to make it go away.




advertisement

 

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

The site is managed by a group of independent volunteers and contractors around the world – most of whom are either family members (with sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, or parents who have suffered from schizophrenia) or people who have schizophrenia. While most of our writers are students of psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience, for the most part we are not full-time working mental health professionals but we are very familiar with the disease both through direct personal experience and extensive reading on the topic.

We rely upon what we believe are good sources of scientifically accurate materials relating to schizophrenia and frequently consult with an ever growing group of schizophrenia researchers who act as unofficial advisors to the site.




advertisement

 

Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

The Center for Applications of Psychological Type, CAPT, was founded in 1975 by Isabel Briggs Myers and Dr. Mary McCaulley, but the seeds of its creation were planted six years earlier when those two women met for the first time.

In 1968, Mary McCaulley, a psychologist then on the faculty of the University of Florida Department of Clinical Psychology, discovered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator instrument in the Buros Mental Measurements Yearbook. She became fascinated with the Indicator and Jung’s concepts of type and began testing it with her students and clients.

Her growing interest in the MBTI instrument led Dr. McCaulley to contact Isabel Myers for information about a book mentioned in the MBTI Manual. The history of CAPT really began with the first conversation that took place between these two women. In the year that followed they corresponded regularly and were finally able to meet a year later in person.

The collaborative relationship between Mary McCaulley and Isabel Myers continued to grow over the next five years. It was during this time that they created the first computer scoring program for the MBTI instrument, conducted research studies of more than 3000 students, and developed the first training programs for professionals, teaching them how to use the Indicator.

By 1975, it became clear to both women that their growing type research and training programs warranted an educational center of its own—and the Center for Applications of Psychological Type was created. In its fledgling stage, CAPT began as a field office of the Medical Student Association Foundation, and four years later became an independent not for profit organization. CAPT has been located in Gainesville, Florida since its inception.

The MBTI instrument was originally published by Educational Testing Service (ETS). When ETS decided to no longer publish the MBTI instrument, it was important that another publisher be found. Mary McCaulley made contact with a psychologist at Stanford University, Jack Black, who had recently started a publishing company, CPP, Inc. In 1976 CPP became the new publisher for the Indicator. Today, the MBTI instrument is still published by CPP and has gone from a little known instrument to one that has gained worldwide acclaim.

CAPT has also flourished over the past thirty plus years, attracting a dynamic and devoted practitioner base, as the interest in and understanding of psychological type has grown. CAPT’s research data bank holds more than a million records from people who have taken the Indicator. The MBTI bibliography has more than 10,000 entries, and the Isabel Briggs Myers Memorial Library has developed into the largest collection of MBTI publications, dissertations and theses in the world.

Isabel Myers and Mary McCaulley met because of a shared interest in people, a fascination with the differences that make us unique, and a desire to understand how those differences can be used constructively to understand and appreciate others and ourselves. CAPT is committed to continuing the mission of these two extraordinary women—to learn more about and to teach the inherent value of our differences, those which make life, as Isabel Myers put it, “more amusing, more interesting and more of a daily adventure than it could possibly be if everyone were alike.”




advertisement