Videos on Psychological Trauma–Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Videos on Psychological Trauma--Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Since 1989, Cavalcade has specialized in producing training videos for therapists and other professionals working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma. Our most popular programs include The Traumatized Child, which describes the effects of abuse and neglect on children, and their needs at home and in school, The ACE Study, which outlines the impact of childhood trauma, neglect, and household dysfunction on adult physical health, and Vicarious Traumatization, which explores the cumulative impact of trauma clients’ stories on care workers. Trauma and Dissociation in Children, which gives child protection professionals a grounding in the psychological impacts of abuse, and provides them with better tools for working with traumatized children, was released in 2007, and was given the APSAC Media Award in June, 2008. In November of 2000, we received the Audio-Visual Media Achievement Award from the International Society for the Study of Dissociation.
Our involvement in child abuse issues began in 1975 with the production of Don’t Give Up On Me, an award-winning training film for social workers dealing with physical abuse cases. This was followed by The Last Taboo, about child sexual abuse, and Double Jeopardy, which examines the plight of the child sexual abuse victim/witness in the criminal justice system.
Cavalcade was founded as a film production company in 1948. Our clients have included DeKalb AgResearch, the American Saddle Horse Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Three of our films won the CINE Golden Eagle, awarded to motion pictures chosen to represent the United States in film festivals abroad. Water, an environmental documentary, received the U.S. Industrial Film Festival Gold Camera, the IFPA Silver Cindy, the Chris Award, and the N.Y. International Film Festival Bronze Medal.

National Center for Victims of Crime

National Center for Victims of Crime

The mission of the National Center for Victims of Crime is to forge a national commitment to help victims of crime rebuild their lives. We are dedicated to serving individuals, families, and communities harmed by crime.
The National Center for Victims of Crime is a nonprofit organization that advocates for victims’ rights, trains professionals who work with victims, and serves as a trusted source of information on victims’ issues. After more than 25 years, we remain the most comprehensive national resource committed to advancing victims’ rights and helping victims of crime rebuild their lives.
The National Center is, at its core, an advocacy organization committed to — and working on behalf of — crime victims and their families. Rather than focus the entire organization’s work on one type of crime or victim, the National Center addresses all types of crime.

Psychonomic Society

Psychonomic Society

For over five decades, the Psychonomic Society has played a critical role in promoting scientific research in psychology and allied sciences. Understanding its beginnings are key to understanding the Society’s current position and how it plans to build on its tradition and transform certain aspects of its work to meet the evolving needs of its members and better serve the field over the next ten years.

However, psychology is a science that is constantly evolving, and the past ten years have seen dramatic changes and an expansion of the field, particularly at its juncture with neuroscience. New and more specialized societies have been created to focus on particular types of science, much as the Psychonomic Society was created in 1959. There has also been a dramatic shift for the Society as it embraced the modern publishing process, divested itself of its own publishing house, and contracted with Springer Publishing to produce its six journals. There was also a transition of Society management from internal staff to an external management firm. In addition, the publishing contract brought in a new and substantial revenue stream that has put the Psychonomic Society in a position to consider various new programs.

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal:  A mental health site for teens administered with the help of Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  It includes resources, glossary, helps with depression, bipolar, anxiety and so much more.  If you are a teen, this a place to check out!

Our Sponsor


National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI)

1 nambi

What started as a small group families gathered around a kitchen table in 1979 has blossomed into the nation’s leading voice on mental health. Today, we are an association of hundreds of local affiliates, state organizations and volunteers who work in your community to raise awareness and provide support and education that was not previously available to those in need.

NAMI relies on gifts and contributions to support our important work.

National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD)

National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD)

As a private, not-for-profit 501(c)(3) membership organization, NASMHPD helps set the agenda and determine the direction of state mental health agency interests across the country, historically including state mental health planning, service delivery, and evaluation. The association provides members with the opportunity to exchange diverse views and experiences, learning from one another in areas vital to effective public policy development and implementation. NASMHPD provides a broad array of services designed to identify and respond to critical policy issues, cutting-edge consultation, training, and technical assistance, and together with the NASMHPD Research Institute, Inc., a partner organization, apprises constituents of the latest in mental health research in administration and services delivery.

Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.