National Center for PTSD

National Center for PTSD The mission of the National Center for PTSD is to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s Veterans and others who have experienced trauma, or who suffer from PTSD, through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s mission is:

To advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The Center was created within the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1989, in response to a Congressional mandate to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD. “Advancing science and promoting understanding of traumatic stress” is the Center’s goal.

In 1995, the National Center created a website. Since September 11th, website usage has grown considerably, and in fiscal year 2006 the site had over 1 million unique users! The website strives to provide current, valid, professional information on a range of topics related to trauma and stress. The site is separated into sections each for one of a variety of audiences, including veterans and their families, clinicians, health care providers, researchers, and others who have or know someone who has experienced a trauma.

The website currently contains more than 1,600 documents, several newsletters you can subscribe to, extensive Web Resource links, and much more:

  • 140 fact sheets
  • 800 downloadable articles
  • Videos for veterans and their families, and for clinicians
  • PTSD 101: a series of expert lectures on PTSD
  • The PILOTS database (the largest interdisciplinary index to the worldwide literature on traumatic stress)
  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide
  • Information for disaster recovery including the Psychological First Aid manual

There & Back

There & Back

There & Back Again is a non-profit reintegration program offered at no cost to veterans of all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Because of their combat service abroad, many veterans return home with a myriad of complex emotional issues, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). TABA offers a structured program of yoga, meditation and alternative approaches to healing the whole body to help veterans transition back to their lives stateside.

Our objective is teach veterans how to use breath awareness, meditation and yoga to manage their symptoms of PTSD, to improve their relationships with loved ones, to begin to fully participate in their lives, and to give back to their fellow veterans through TABA’s Train the Trainer program. TABA is comprised of respected professionals who are dedicated to the healing of our military men and women, and our program is based on both the latest research on the benefits of alternative therapies and staff and advisory board members’ personal successes managing symptoms of PTSD.

A multifaceted approach to wellness, including yoga, Reiki, acupuncture, meditation and other alternative therapies help empower veterans to manage their own challenges of reintegration.

There & Back Again incorporates a whole body approach to wellness.  Recognizing the three parts of our “self” – our mind/thoughts, our physical body and our emotional/spiritual self.  A combat experience is an extreme experience that can disconnect us from one or all of aspects of our “self.”  There & Back Again provides Veterans an opportunity to reconnect and reintegrate all parts of their “self.”

Many Veterans have found that these tools, along with traditional therapies, help them manage their challenges better allowing them to fully participate in their lives.

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal:  A mental health site for teens administered with the help of Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  It includes resources, glossary, helps with depression, bipolar, anxiety and so much more.  If you are a teen, this a place to check out!

National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI)

1 nambi

What started as a small group families gathered around a kitchen table in 1979 has blossomed into the nation’s leading voice on mental health. Today, we are an association of hundreds of local affiliates, state organizations and volunteers who work in your community to raise awareness and provide support and education that was not previously available to those in need.

NAMI relies on gifts and contributions to support our important work.

Our Sponsor


Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

The Hot Stove Project

The Hot Stove Project

The Hot Stove Project aims to integrate individuals who are presently marginalized due to mental health issues.

We believe such integration can be achieved through the exchange of ideas between groups of people with differing perspectives on mental health.

Whether you are an employer, mental health provider, educator, and/or a person with lived experience, we hope that you will contribute to the understanding of what it means to live with mental disorders and how those who think, feel, and behave differently are not only too often marginalized, but isolate themselves as a consequence of fear and misunderstanding.

Our Project is an open invitation to professional societies and interdisciplinary conferences whose participants represent varying perspectives on medication, forced hospitalization, HIPAA laws, and much more to continue dialogue across such mental health divides.

Autism Society

Autism Society

Since 1965, the Autism Society has been a leader in serving people with autism, their families and professionals. We provide the most comprehensive Information and Referral service via our toll-free number, 1-800-3AUTISM, and the largest online referral database, AutismSource.
The Autism Society is the home of the Autism Awareness Puzzle Ribbon, one of the most recognizable cause-related symbols, and founded National Autism Awareness Month, which helps focus attention on autism in April of every year. The Autism Society’s 107 affiliates nationwide are incubators for local programs such as Safe and Sound, camps, respite care and social skills events.
The Autism Society supports research that will help families living with autism. Today, 67 individuals will be diagnosed with autism, and their families have no clear path for treating the symptoms of this medical condition. For this reason, the Autism Society has launched research initiatives to look into early diagnosis and early intervention, the environmental triggers of autism, environmental factors that exacerbate health conditions, and, most importantly, a comprehensive, coordinated treatment-guided research initiative.
For over 40 years, the Autism Society has hosted the largest conference on autism spectrum disorders each July.