No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

Society for the Teaching Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology

Society for the Teaching Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology

From Division 2 of the American Psychological Association, Society for the Teaching of Psychology, there are many resources that can help instructors, students, and just psychologists who do not have a classroom in which to work.  From Abnormal to Statistics, Research and Teaching, there are a myriad of resources, handouts, and PowerPoints that anyone can use better understand the process of psychology.

 

The APA Youtube’s Channel

11 youtube

The American Psychological Association’s Youtube’s Channel includes videos of the ever popular, “This is Psychology” from the APA President, discussions about research methodologies, tutorial videos, training videos and many more instructional and informational videos.

While this at first seems set up for the APA member, anyone can benefit from most of the videos included.  Highly worth a visit!

The Observer

The Observer

Published 10 times per year by the Association for Psychological Science, the Observer educates and informs the Association on matters affecting the research, academic, and applied disciplines of psychology; promotes the scientific values of APS Members; reports and comments on issues of national interest to the psychological scientist community; and provides a vehicle for the dissemination of information on APS.  For Non-Members, you may pay a short-time usage fee, or become a member.  For members of the APS, you log in with your account, and you can automatically read the Observer.

Our Sponsor


MindYourMind

 MindYourMind

These resources are designed to reduce the stigma associated with mental illness and increase access and use of community support, both professional and peer-based.

Through the use of active engagement, best practice and technology, MindYourMind inspires youth to reach out, get help and give help.

This site has tips for when you are in crisis, need help, creating wellness for yourself, facts about all kinds of mental illness, fun interactive apps and games, personal expressions, interviews and ways to get involved and help others.

Shrink Talk

Shrink Talk

On a regular basis I’m asked “What’s it really like to be a shrink, to help people with problems all day, to listen to others pour their hearts out to you?” It can be many things: daunting, humbling, gratifying, inspiring, depressing, yet sometimes bizarre and humorous (to both my clients and me). In short, it’s the greatest job in the world. So read on to more fully understand what happens “on the couch,” learn a bit about people and what makes them tick, and see that mental health treatment is not for the “weak or crazy.”

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.