Shrink Talk

Shrink Talk

On a regular basis I’m asked “What’s it really like to be a shrink, to help people with problems all day, to listen to others pour their hearts out to you?” It can be many things: daunting, humbling, gratifying, inspiring, depressing, yet sometimes bizarre and humorous (to both my clients and me). In short, it’s the greatest job in the world. So read on to more fully understand what happens “on the couch,” learn a bit about people and what makes them tick, and see that mental health treatment is not for the “weak or crazy.”

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

PsychoTube

PsychoTube

Free psychology videos dealing with a myriad of topics, from Mood Disorders to Cognitive Behavioral Therapies to Anxiety Disorders.  Also listed are clinical psychology, developmental psychology, therapy, learning psychology, cognitive psychology, memory and other forms of psychotherapies.  Psychotube is a new way to share video and audio clips with other psychology teachers.
Many psychology teachers use short video and audio clips to facilitate their teaching of psychology and this site provides a way of organizing these clips.

 

The majority of these videos are Youtube or TED talks, but are very interesting and well worth the views!  You may subscribe, view the amazingly full dictionary, or glossary or of course, view the videos!

Our Sponsor


Positive Psychology Center

Positive Psychology Center

Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The field is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.

The mission of the Positive Psychology Center (PPC) at the University of Pennsylvania is to promote research, training, education, and the dissemination of Positive Psychology. The PPC is internationally recognized for empirical studies in Positive Psychology and resilience. The Center’s scholars are world-renowned experts in the fields of Positive Psychology, resilience, and grit. The Center established the world’s first Master of Applied Positive Psychology program (MAPP). We offer state-of-the-art training programs in Positive Psychology and resilience for educational institutions, the U.S. Army, and other organizations around the world.

Dr. Martin E.P. Seligman is the Director of the Center and a Professor of Psychology. He is a leading authority in the fields of Positive Psychology, resilience, learned helplessness, depression, optimism and pessimism. He is also an expert on interventions that prevent depression, and build strengths and well-being. He has written more than 250 scholarly publications and about 20 books.

The Positive Psychology Center is located at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Martin Seligman is the director of the center and Zellerbach Family Professor of Psychology.

The center promotes research, training, education, and the dissemination of Positive Psychology. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive.

Therapy, Ethics, Malpractice, Forensics, Critical Thinking (and a few other topics)

articles researchKen Pope, Ph.D., ABPP, has set up this site to provides free access articles from journals such as American Psychologist,  Clinical Psychology: Science & Practice; Psychology, Public Policy, & Law; and Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, among others — as well as the complete book titled Children, Ethics, & the Law.

It also links to licensing agencies in Canada and the United States, ethics codes, informed consent; forensic assessment checklists and more!

Minds Like Ours (MILO)

minds like oursA mental health support community (abbreviated MILO) for those 1 in 4 living with these kinds of disorders. Of course, even 1 of a million is 1 too many, but at least there is help.

Raise awareness of mental health issues with others–remind people that there are many more people that are good productive citizens who have mental health problems than there are people who are bad, nonproductive citizens!  You can take part in competitions inside MILO, unite with others, and support others like you who need to be supported.  Don’t be in it alone!

They have forums, helplines, blogs, volunteer and shop in their store. Help others and help yourself!

7 Cups of Tea

7 cups of teaIt is important to have someone to listen to you sometimes.  Someone to truly listen to you–and not judge you and to not know your past history or hangups.  Some people just need someone to listen to them, period, and not talk at all.  It is important to have someone to listen back.  I have been there myself!

 With 7 Cups of Tea, listeners are trained in Active Listening. Some of the listeners are free, some charge a nominal fee for their service.  Nominal from what I have seen is from .50 USD down to .003 USD per minute.

 At present they are doing over 100 call and chat requests a day. They currently work with a number of organizations like NAMI, Active Minds, the International Bipolar Foundation and several others.

If you feel you have no one to talk to, here you are.  Someone to listen to you, someone who will definitely hear what you have to say.