To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

It’s been nine years since Jamie posted the original TWLOHA story online, and we’re still here. We’re still working to let people know that hope is real and that they can get the help they deserve. Your story is important.

This began in the spring of 2006, when To Write Love on Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story about a friend struggling with depression, addiction, and self- injury. The words and the life it represented shed light on the reality of contrast—pain and peace, addiction and sobriety, regret and freedom. The title, “To Write Love on Her Arms,” also represented a goal—to believe that a better life was possible. A MySpace page was created to give the story a home, and T-shirts were sold to pay for the friend’s treatment.

As the days passed and the blog was shared, it became clear that this story was not just about one person. We heard from people longing to lift the heavy weight of depression, to be free from addiction or self-injury, to stay alive and live fully. We also heard from people mourning those they’d lost to such struggles, asking what they could do to bring hope to their communities. We learned that two out of three people who struggle with depression never seek help, and that untreated depression is the leading cause of suicide. In America alone, it’s estimated that 19 million people live with depression, and suicide is the third-leading cause of death among those 15-24 years old. It seemed we had stumbled into a bigger story, a conversation that needed to be had. These are issues of humanity, problems of pain that affect millions of people around the world, regardless of age, race, gender, religious belief, orientation, and background.

Over the years, TWLOHA has become much more than a blog and a T-shirt. Through musician support, tours, and social media, the message of hope and help has reached an audience broader than we could have ever anticipated. We’ve expanded from a computer screen to conferences, campuses, programs, and events around the country and the world, where we challenge the stigma and stereotypes that have surrounded mental health issues for so long. And we’re investing into treatment and recovery, offering financial support to organizations, centers, and individuals laboring in the priceless work of healing.

TWLOHA is honored to be a part of this continuing story, to invite people into the conversation, and to be a bridge to the better life we continue to believe is possible.



Videos on Psychological Trauma–Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Videos on Psychological Trauma--Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Since 1989, Cavalcade has specialized in producing training videos for therapists and other professionals working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma. Our most popular programs include The Traumatized Child, which describes the effects of abuse and neglect on children, and their needs at home and in school, The ACE Study, which outlines the impact of childhood trauma, neglect, and household dysfunction on adult physical health, and Vicarious Traumatization, which explores the cumulative impact of trauma clients’ stories on care workers. Trauma and Dissociation in Children, which gives child protection professionals a grounding in the psychological impacts of abuse, and provides them with better tools for working with traumatized children, was released in 2007, and was given the APSAC Media Award in June, 2008. In November of 2000, we received the Audio-Visual Media Achievement Award from the International Society for the Study of Dissociation.
Our involvement in child abuse issues began in 1975 with the production of Don’t Give Up On Me, an award-winning training film for social workers dealing with physical abuse cases. This was followed by The Last Taboo, about child sexual abuse, and Double Jeopardy, which examines the plight of the child sexual abuse victim/witness in the criminal justice system.
Cavalcade was founded as a film production company in 1948. Our clients have included DeKalb AgResearch, the American Saddle Horse Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Three of our films won the CINE Golden Eagle, awarded to motion pictures chosen to represent the United States in film festivals abroad. Water, an environmental documentary, received the U.S. Industrial Film Festival Gold Camera, the IFPA Silver Cindy, the Chris Award, and the N.Y. International Film Festival Bronze Medal.



International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation (IAEDP)

International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation (IAEDP)The IAEDP Mission:


To promote a high level of professionalism among practitioners who treat those suffering from eating disorders by promoting ethical and professional standards, offering education and training in the field, certifying those who have met prescribed requirements, promoting public and professional awareness of eating disorders and assisting in prevention efforts.



Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.



Our Sponsor

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.



Mirror, Mirror Eating Disorders

mirror mirrorUpfront, this website is not a website that is for a person who needs a Doctor who would come and tell you what to do with your Eating Disorder or whether you even have an Eating Disorder.  However; that being said, this website is well worth it’s weight (no pun intended) as it understands and appreciates the suffering and shame you might be going through.

Started back in 1997 by Colleen Thompson, when she was having an eating disorder issue, she wanted to educate herself and provide support to herself and others who need assistance from the eating disorder.  Mirror, Mirror even asks that if you do not find the information on their website that pertains to you that you can email them and they will either try to include the information or direct you to a website or to somewhere where the information can be found.

With any kind of disorder people are suffering from, there are two things:  people don’t want to have it (of course), and people want to know they are not suffering alone.  This site helps those who suffer from Eating Disorders to alleviate the later, and hopefully the former.



Emergency Mental Health Educational Manual

This manual is written by the University of British Columbia, however; there are many facets here that will provide useful to those of us in the States. Mostly interesting to the the common layperson who is interested in psychology/psychiatry or the student, this manual is a well-thought out guide to how to help others when help is needed right now.




ReachOut is an information and support service using evidence based principles and technology to help teens and young adults facing tough times and struggling with mental health issues. All content is written by teens and young adults, for teens and young adults, to meet them where they are, and help them recognize their own strengths and use those strengths to overcome their difficulties and/or seek help if necessary.   The Inspire USA Foundation oversees ReachOut. has 4 key sections:

  • The Facts provides information on a range of mental health issues
  • Real Stories shares personal experiences with mental health issues from teens and young adults and how they got through these issues
  • Get Help provides information about how you might find the help you need
  • Add Your Voice presents opportunities for you to contribute content to ReachOut and have your opinions become part of the larger ReachOut community.