Brain Sponge

Brain Sponge

Brain Sponge Blog aims to help people who are lucky enough to have brains to use them efficiently and to help keep them functioning for longer. The brain is the most important piece of hardware that we will ever own and it does not come with a manual.

It’s ironic that we are expected to learn a myriad of topics but that no one teaches us the most important skill of all – how to learn effectively.

When we do learn something we then tend to promptly forget it!

Brain Sponge is your toolbox of tips, tricks, hacks and techniques to help you compete in a world where learning never stops!

However, knowing how to learn is not the only tool you need. Brain Sponge brings you the latest research on how to keep your brain healthy and how to hack your mind for best maximum performance. Your brain is the most important organ that you have, let’s try to understand it together.

So come along for the ride! Sign up for the newsletter and check back regularly. You never know what you’ll find.




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Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Founded in 1936, SPSSI is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields and others who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of important social and policy issues. In various ways, SPSSI seeks to bring theory and practice into focus on human problems of the group, the community, and nations, as well as the increasingly important problems that have no national boundaries.

SPSSI affords social and behavioral scientists opportunities to apply their knowledge and insights to the critical problems of today’s world.

SPSSI fosters and funds research on social issues through annual awards and programs of small research grants and disseminates research findings through its scholarly journals, sponsored books, specialized conferences, and its convention programs.

With headquarters in Washington, DC, the Society influences public policy through its publications and the advocacy efforts of its members, fellows, and staff.

SPSSI encourages public education and social activism on social issues and facilitates information exchange through its newsletter and electronic dsicussion groups.

The Society’s mission is extended to the global arena by a team of representatives who cover developments at UN headquarters in New York and Geneva. SPSSI has been represented at the United Nations as a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) since 1987. SPSSI serves as consultant to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

An independent society, SPSSI is also Division 9 of the American Psychological Association (APA) and an organizational affiliate of the American Psychological Society (APS). SPSSI members are not required to be members of APA or APS. We welcome the membership of anyone interested in the Society.




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National Institutes of Mental Health

National Institutes of Mental Health

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the lead Federal agency for research on mental illnesses. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.
The urgency of this mission arises from the public health burden. According to recent estimates, mental illnesses account for 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability in the United States. An estimated 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI) in which the ability to function in daily life is significantly impaired. Those with SMI die 10 years earlier than individuals in the general population, on average. Furthermore, over 41,149 Americans die each year from suicide, more than twice the annual mortality from homicide or AIDS. Beyond the morbidity and mortality, a conservative estimate places the direct and indirect financial costs associated with mental illnesses in the United States at well over $300 billion annually. Mental illnesses rank as the third most costly medical conditions in terms of overall health care expenditure, behind heart conditions and traumatic injury.




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Suicidal No More

Suicidal No More

Suicidal No More: Choosing to Live with Schizoaffective Disorder is a blog by author, public speaker, and NAMI advocate Jennifer Robinson, who discusses her personal struggles and triumphs living with a serious mental illness that involves both psychosis and the symptoms of bipolar disorder. She provides coping tips, resources for people who are experiencing suicidal ideation, suggestions for reaching out for help, and information on what life is like for people who live with serious and persistent mental illnesses. This blog has been online for ten years, and since then Jennifer has co-authored the book Episodes of Schizophrenia, and been published in the anthology Parts Unbound: Narratives on Mental Illness and Health.




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Videos on Psychological Trauma–Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Videos on Psychological Trauma--Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Since 1989, Cavalcade has specialized in producing training videos for therapists and other professionals working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma. Our most popular programs include The Traumatized Child, which describes the effects of abuse and neglect on children, and their needs at home and in school, The ACE Study, which outlines the impact of childhood trauma, neglect, and household dysfunction on adult physical health, and Vicarious Traumatization, which explores the cumulative impact of trauma clients’ stories on care workers. Trauma and Dissociation in Children, which gives child protection professionals a grounding in the psychological impacts of abuse, and provides them with better tools for working with traumatized children, was released in 2007, and was given the APSAC Media Award in June, 2008. In November of 2000, we received the Audio-Visual Media Achievement Award from the International Society for the Study of Dissociation.
Our involvement in child abuse issues began in 1975 with the production of Don’t Give Up On Me, an award-winning training film for social workers dealing with physical abuse cases. This was followed by The Last Taboo, about child sexual abuse, and Double Jeopardy, which examines the plight of the child sexual abuse victim/witness in the criminal justice system.
Cavalcade was founded as a film production company in 1948. Our clients have included DeKalb AgResearch, the American Saddle Horse Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Three of our films won the CINE Golden Eagle, awarded to motion pictures chosen to represent the United States in film festivals abroad. Water, an environmental documentary, received the U.S. Industrial Film Festival Gold Camera, the IFPA Silver Cindy, the Chris Award, and the N.Y. International Film Festival Bronze Medal.




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National Center for Victims of Crime

National Center for Victims of Crime

The mission of the National Center for Victims of Crime is to forge a national commitment to help victims of crime rebuild their lives. We are dedicated to serving individuals, families, and communities harmed by crime.
The National Center for Victims of Crime is a nonprofit organization that advocates for victims’ rights, trains professionals who work with victims, and serves as a trusted source of information on victims’ issues. After more than 25 years, we remain the most comprehensive national resource committed to advancing victims’ rights and helping victims of crime rebuild their lives.
The National Center is, at its core, an advocacy organization committed to — and working on behalf of — crime victims and their families. Rather than focus the entire organization’s work on one type of crime or victim, the National Center addresses all types of crime.




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Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.



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The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.




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