Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

Therapy, Ethics, Malpractice, Forensics, Critical Thinking (and a few other topics)

articles researchKen Pope, Ph.D., ABPP, has set up this site to provides free access articles from journals such as American Psychologist,  Clinical Psychology: Science & Practice; Psychology, Public Policy, & Law; and Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, among others — as well as the complete book titled Children, Ethics, & the Law.

It also links to licensing agencies in Canada and the United States, ethics codes, informed consent; forensic assessment checklists and more!

National Coalition for the Homeless

national coalition for the homelessThe National Coalition for the Homeless is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission: To prevent and end homelessness while ensuring the immediate needs of those experiencing homelessness are met and their civil rights protected.

We envision a world where everyone has a safe, decent, affordable and accessible home. We are committed to creating the systemic and attitudinal changes necessary to prevent and end homelessness. We take as our first principle of practice that people who are currently experiencing homelessness or have formerly experienced homelessness must be actively involved in all of our work. Our programs are centered around public education, policy advocacy, and grassroots organizing, and are focused on the issues of housing justice, economic justice, health care justice, and civil rights.

Our Sponsor


Alzheimer’s Disease Research Foundation

Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder characterized by a steady decline in cognitive ability. It is the most common form of dementia. With any endeavor, the efforts of many can easily surpass those of the few; feel free to contribute your experience for the benefit of all. We’ll all be the better for it.

student mental illness lifeline

SMILe was formed in 2008 after its founder discovered that she was not the only one suffering in (relative) silence through University with mental illness. Students she talked to felt their universities didn’t want to admit their students were ‘unhappy’, especially in the long term, and that as students their vulnerability was overlooked.

One of the worst parts of mental illness is that it is so emotionally draining that looking and fighting for the help and support you need becomes almost impossible. SMILe was set up to make finding the right information and help easier. It is built on careful research and the personal experiences of mental illness sufferers from several universities.

We hope you find it helpful. Please get in touch if there is any information that you would like adding to the site or if you find a broken link that needs updating.

APA: This is Psychology

These brief videos are intended to educate the general public about the science of psychology and to illustrate how psychological research can be applied to a broad range of issues and challenges. They are part of an expanded APA public education campaign to increase people’s understanding and appreciation of psychological science. We are particularly excited about their potential for use as part of secondary school psychology and other science programs.

The first release includes an introduction, an episode on bullying, and an episode on young children’s mental health. We hope you find them interesting and informative. Feel free to link to these videos from your professional websites. APA will be linking to them on our Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

Fenichel’s Current Topics In Psychology

There are many, many topics here to choose from.  They are listed from A-Z. This site provides useful general references for both professionals and the general public.  There are many good resources here, including information, support groups, and clinical treatment providers.