Society for the Study of Social Problems

Society for the Study of Social Problems

SSSP members are an interdisciplinary community of scholars, practitioners, advocates, and students interested in the application of critical, scientific, and humanistic perspectives to the study of vital social problems. If you are involved in scholarship or action in pursuit of a just society nationally or internationally, you belong in the SSSP. You will meet others engaged in research to find the causes and consequences of social problems, as well as others seeking to apply existing scholarship to the formulation of social policies. Many members are social scientists by training. Many teach in colleges and universities. Increasing numbers work in applied research and policy settings. Membership is open to anyone who supports SSSP’s goals.




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Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences

FABBS is a coalition of scientific societies that share an interest in advancing the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior. Our goal is to promote human potential and well-being through research knowledge gained from these sciences. We communicate the importance and contributions of basic and applied research in these areas to policy makers and the public. We work in close cooperation with scientific societies in the fields of social science, psychology, education, and neuroscience. Academic units and corporations that share these goals support the organization as affiliates.

Our sister organization, FABBS Foundation, was created in 2004 to conduct educational activities that enhance understanding of the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior. FABBS Foundation also recognizes eminent, senior scientists who have made significant contributions to our sciences.

FABBS represents the interests of its scientific societies by:

Educating federal representatives and Congress about the importance of research in the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior

Advocating for legislation and policy that enhance training and research

Providing sources of expertise and knowledge to federal agencies, Congress, and the media

Encouraging the sound use of science in the creation of public policy

Fostering effective interaction between agencies and organizations that fund research and the community of scientists and scientific societies

Facilitating information exchange among constituent societies as well as other scientific organizations




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Association for Contextual Behavioral Science

Association for Contextual Behavioral Science

Founded in 2005 (incorporated in 2006), the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) is dedicated to the advancement of functional contextual cognitive and behavioral science and practice so as to alleviate human suffering and advance human well being. This organization seeks:

The development of a coherent and progressive science of human action that is more adequate to the challenges of the human condition

The development of useful basic principles, workable applied theories linked to these principles, effective applied technologies based on these theories, and successful means of training and disseminating these developments, guided by the best available scientific evidence

The development of a view of science that values a dynamic, ongoing interaction between its basic and applied elements, and between practical application and empirical knowledge

Development of a community of scholars, researchers, educators, and practitioners who will work in a collegial, open, self-critical, non-discriminatory, and mutually supportive way that is effective in producing valued outcomes and in exploring the additional implications of this work, and that emphasizes open and low cost methods of connecting with this work so as to keep the focus on benefit to others.

The Association welcomes professional, student, and affiliate members.




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Breaking Prejudice

Breaking Prejudice

History documents the repeated devaluation and exclusion of certain groups. Even today, while it may be less evident, discrimination affects people of all ages, races, genders, sexual orientations, and abilities. But if individuals and groups stand up and speak out, things can and will change. Our differences are inconsequential when it comes to being human. Therefore, they should not affect how we treat other individuals.




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Our Sponsor


Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Founded in 1936, SPSSI is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields and others who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of important social and policy issues. In various ways, SPSSI seeks to bring theory and practice into focus on human problems of the group, the community, and nations, as well as the increasingly important problems that have no national boundaries.

SPSSI affords social and behavioral scientists opportunities to apply their knowledge and insights to the critical problems of today’s world.

SPSSI fosters and funds research on social issues through annual awards and programs of small research grants and disseminates research findings through its scholarly journals, sponsored books, specialized conferences, and its convention programs.

With headquarters in Washington, DC, the Society influences public policy through its publications and the advocacy efforts of its members, fellows, and staff.

SPSSI encourages public education and social activism on social issues and facilitates information exchange through its newsletter and electronic dsicussion groups.

The Society’s mission is extended to the global arena by a team of representatives who cover developments at UN headquarters in New York and Geneva. SPSSI has been represented at the United Nations as a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) since 1987. SPSSI serves as consultant to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

An independent society, SPSSI is also Division 9 of the American Psychological Association (APA) and an organizational affiliate of the American Psychological Society (APS). SPSSI members are not required to be members of APA or APS. We welcome the membership of anyone interested in the Society.




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No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

No Kidding, Me Too! is a 501(c)(3) public charity, whose purpose is to remove the stigma attached to brain dis-ease (BD) through education and the breaking down of societal barriers. Our goal is to empower those with BD to admit their illness, seek treatment, and become even greater members of society.  Make BD cool and sexy. We want a normal conversation in America to be: “I have bipolar disorder/schizophrenia/insert dis-ease” “No Kidding, Me Too!”

 




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Autism Now

Autism Now

Welcome to the Autism NOW Center. The nation’s source for resources and information on community-based solutions for individuals with autism, other developmental disabilities, and their families. A national initiative of The Arc. On this webpage, you will find some statistical information regarding the number of resources currently on the Autism NOW website. This information assists Autism NOW in describing the size and reach of the website currently. We also use this information to help direct our focus for upcoming expansions of the website.  You will also find blogs, resources, social bookmarking and the latest news.




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National Institutes of Mental Health

National Institutes of Mental Health

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the lead Federal agency for research on mental illnesses. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.
The urgency of this mission arises from the public health burden. According to recent estimates, mental illnesses account for 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability in the United States. An estimated 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI) in which the ability to function in daily life is significantly impaired. Those with SMI die 10 years earlier than individuals in the general population, on average. Furthermore, over 41,149 Americans die each year from suicide, more than twice the annual mortality from homicide or AIDS. Beyond the morbidity and mortality, a conservative estimate places the direct and indirect financial costs associated with mental illnesses in the United States at well over $300 billion annually. Mental illnesses rank as the third most costly medical conditions in terms of overall health care expenditure, behind heart conditions and traumatic injury.




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