National Center for PTSD

National Center for PTSD The mission of the National Center for PTSD is to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s Veterans and others who have experienced trauma, or who suffer from PTSD, through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s mission is:

To advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The Center was created within the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1989, in response to a Congressional mandate to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD. “Advancing science and promoting understanding of traumatic stress” is the Center’s goal.

In 1995, the National Center created a website. Since September 11th, website usage has grown considerably, and in fiscal year 2006 the site had over 1 million unique users! The website strives to provide current, valid, professional information on a range of topics related to trauma and stress. The site is separated into sections each for one of a variety of audiences, including veterans and their families, clinicians, health care providers, researchers, and others who have or know someone who has experienced a trauma.

The website currently contains more than 1,600 documents, several newsletters you can subscribe to, extensive Web Resource links, and much more:

  • 140 fact sheets
  • 800 downloadable articles
  • Videos for veterans and their families, and for clinicians
  • PTSD 101: a series of expert lectures on PTSD
  • The PILOTS database (the largest interdisciplinary index to the worldwide literature on traumatic stress)
  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide
  • Information for disaster recovery including the Psychological First Aid manual

Videos on Psychological Trauma–Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Videos on Psychological Trauma--Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Since 1989, Cavalcade has specialized in producing training videos for therapists and other professionals working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma. Our most popular programs include The Traumatized Child, which describes the effects of abuse and neglect on children, and their needs at home and in school, The ACE Study, which outlines the impact of childhood trauma, neglect, and household dysfunction on adult physical health, and Vicarious Traumatization, which explores the cumulative impact of trauma clients’ stories on care workers. Trauma and Dissociation in Children, which gives child protection professionals a grounding in the psychological impacts of abuse, and provides them with better tools for working with traumatized children, was released in 2007, and was given the APSAC Media Award in June, 2008. In November of 2000, we received the Audio-Visual Media Achievement Award from the International Society for the Study of Dissociation.
Our involvement in child abuse issues began in 1975 with the production of Don’t Give Up On Me, an award-winning training film for social workers dealing with physical abuse cases. This was followed by The Last Taboo, about child sexual abuse, and Double Jeopardy, which examines the plight of the child sexual abuse victim/witness in the criminal justice system.
Cavalcade was founded as a film production company in 1948. Our clients have included DeKalb AgResearch, the American Saddle Horse Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Three of our films won the CINE Golden Eagle, awarded to motion pictures chosen to represent the United States in film festivals abroad. Water, an environmental documentary, received the U.S. Industrial Film Festival Gold Camera, the IFPA Silver Cindy, the Chris Award, and the N.Y. International Film Festival Bronze Medal.

1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.

Violence unSilenced

Violence unSilenced

Violence UnSilenced is a resource site that has been fostered by a community of rape, domestic violence, childhood abuse survivors and personal bloggers. Formerly a non-profit organization guided by a board of directors, the site is now maintained by Violence UnSilenced founder, journalist Maggie Ginsberg. From 2008–2104, the Violence UnSilenced project published personal accounts of interpersonal violence, giving voice to over many hundreds of survivor stories. The project is no longer accepting new submissions or comments, but it still offers access to the existing body of stories to stand as powerful, collaborative testimonial that honors survivors everywhere. Please continue to read, to speak out, and to support one another.

Our Sponsor


CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal

CopeCareDeal:  A mental health site for teens administered with the help of Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  It includes resources, glossary, helps with depression, bipolar, anxiety and so much more.  If you are a teen, this a place to check out!

The Northwest Network

The Northwest Network

The NW Network increases our communities’ ability to support the self-determination and safety of bisexual, transgender, lesbian and gay survivors of abuse through education, organizing and advocacy. We work within a broad liberation movement dedicated to social and economic justice, equality and respect for all people and the creation of loving, inclusive and accountable communities.  Ending abuse and creating the conditions to support equitable relationships is a huge task.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

Parents Without Partners

Parents Without PartnersWelcome to Parents Without Partners (PWP), the largest international, nonprofit membership organization devoted to the welfare and interests of single parents and their children.

Single parents may join one of the many chapter around the US and Canada; they may be male or female, custodial or non-custodial, separated, divorced, widowed or never married.

Parents without Partners aims to help those who have lost a spouse through many different circumstances including death, divorce, custodial issues and more. Through the resources on the site, parents can better understand how to raise a child and live a productive life.