Learn to Cope

Learn to Cope

Joanne Peterson is the Founder and Executive Director of Learn to Cope (LTC), a non-profit peer-led support network which began in 2004. Mrs. Peterson’s journey started as a young girl with siblings experiencing issues with mental illness and addiction. Years later when Joanne discovered that her own son’s experimentation with prescription drugs led to an opioid addiction, she was motivated and empowered to use her voice to bring about change. Today her son is in long term recovery. She designed LTC to offer families the support, education, resources and hope that her family would have benefited from.

 

Funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MADPH), LTC has grown to have a full-staff who collaborate with communities across the state to spread messages of prevention, education, awareness and advocacy. Learn to Cope has over 9,000 members on a private online forum, 25 chapters throughout Massachusetts and most recently 2 chapters in Florida and 1 in Boise, Idaho. LTC families receive unique support and education from professionals and their peers. Through advocacy and awareness, Mrs. Peterson collaborated with MADPH to become the first parent network in the country to provide the overdose reversal antidote nasal Naloxone. Today, 80 of the 200 LTC facilitators are trained and certified to provided overdose education and nasal naloxone kits at each chapter. Since December of 2011 there have been over 100 documented successful reversals by LTC members.

 

With the growth and expansion of LTC, Mrs. Peterson has been called upon by high level government officials, law enforcement, and educators to assist in their efforts to combat the opioid epidemic. In 2015 Mrs. Peterson was one of the recipients of the Advocate for Action award from the Office of National Drug Control Policy and was also Senator Markey’s guest at the State of the Union Address. In March 2016, Mrs. Peterson was asked by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker to participate as a panelist for the National Governors Association Health and Human Services Committee to discuss the Nation’s opioid crisis. Most recently, Mrs. Peterson was invited to the West Wing to participate in a discussion held by Michael Botticelli, the National Drug Control Policy Director, on the Administration’s efforts to address the country’s opioid epidemic. Currently, Mrs. Peterson sits on the Massachusetts Health and Human Services Emergency Department Boarding Work Group, as well as the Governor’s Special Commission to Study Licensed Addiction Treatment Centers.




advertisement

 

Clubhouse International

Clubhouse International>We help start and grow Clubhouses globally where people with mental illness can go to get their lives back.

There simply are not enough resources today for everyone with a mental illness who needs help. It’s a crisis situation and the numbers are growing.

Clubhouses powerfully demonstrate that people with mental illness can and do lead productive, happy lives. Each Clubhouse we open reaches +/- 500 people in need!  Clubhouse International has succeeded in creating something that didn’t exist before: A worldwide community that is changing the world of mental health. Through over 320 local Clubhouses around the world, we offer people living with mental illness opportunities for friendship, employment, housing, education and access to medical and psychiatric services in a single caring and safe environment – so they can recover and fully participate as valued and respected members of society.




advertisement

 

myStrength

myStrength

Knowing that there must be a way to overcome these obstacles, we set out to help those we love…and the more than 50 million others who are working through mental health disorders. The vision for myStrength— The health club for your mind—was born as we realized that the Internet and mobile applications provide a perfect way to help those in need. Done right, digital resources that complement other forms of care, such as medication and working with a mental health professional, could give users support that is affordable, accessible, and devoid of the negative image that mental healthcare sometimes carries.

To make our vision real, we leveraged our extensive digital consumer experience, tapped into our online learning expertise, and surrounded ourselves with brilliant partners and advisors. Together, we created myStrength to give people the resources they need to help create real and lasting change. Change that makes their lives, and the lives of the people around them, better.




advertisement

 

The Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

The Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

ASPPB is the association of psychology licensing boards in the United States and Canada. Formed in 1961, ASPPB creates the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP), which is used by licensing boards to assess candidates for licensure and certification. ASPPB also offers several mobility programs to assist in licensure of psychologists already licensed in another state, province, or territory, and also publishes materials for training programs and for students preparing to enter the profession.

Our mission is to enhance services and support its member jurisdictions in fulfilling their goal of advancing public protection by offering exemplary examination and credentialing programs, providing state of the art programs and services to all our stakeholders, serving as the source for the most current and accurate information about the regulation of psychologists and contributing to the critical consumer protection perspective in the on-going development of the profession.




advertisement

 

Advertisement


American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

AACAP partners with our members in advocacy efforts at the federal and state levels to improve policies and services for children and adolescents with mental illness. We work to educate policymakers and administrators about issues affecting child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health and regularly engage our members on pertinent legislation and regulatory activities. AACAP continually develops resources for members to use as they communicate with policymakers about issues related to child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health. Make your voice heard on behalf of children with mental illness! Through AACAP’s Legislative Action Center, you can take action on our current federal advocacy alerts, correspond with your members of Congress and the Administration, and contact your local media. And AACAP sends regular advocacy updates and action alerts to keep members updated on federal and state legislation and provide opportunities to get involved. Click here to read past updates and alerts.




advertisement

 

CHADD–The National Resource On ADHD

CHADD--The National Resource On ADHD

Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) was founded in 1987 in response to the frustration and sense of isolation experienced by parents and their children with ADHD. At that time, one could turn to very few places for support or information. Many people seriously misunderstood ADHD. Many clinicians and educators knew little about the disability, and individuals with ADHD were often mistakenly labeled “a behavior problem,” “unmotivated,” or “not intelligent enough.”

ADHD is medically and legally recognized as a treatable yet potentially serious disorder, affecting up to nine percent of all children, and approximately four percent of adults.

Today, children with ADHD are eligible for special education services or accommodations within the regular classroom when needed, and adults with ADHD may be eligible for accommodations in the workplace under the Americans with Disabilities Act. CHADD is a success story, inspired by the desire of countless parents to see their children with ADHD succeed. From one parent support group in Florida, the organization grew dramatically to become the leading non-profit national organization for children and adults with ADHD.

The organization has a small national staff, which manages the day-to-day responsibilities, while its Board of Directors sets policy and oversees the organization’s well being. The organization is composed of dedicated volunteers from around the country who play an integral part in the association’s success by providing support, education and encouragement to parents, educators and professionals on a grassroots level through CHADD chapters. Along with its growth in membership and reputation, CHADD has retained the passion and commitment of its founders.




advertisement

 

International OCD Foundation

International OCD Foundation

The International OCD Foundation is a donor-supported nonprofit organization. Founded in 1986 by a small group of individuals with OCD, the Foundation has grown into an international membership-based organization serving a broad community of individuals with OCD and related disorders their family members and loved ones and mental health professionals and researchers. We have affiliates in 25 states and territories in the US, in addition to global partnerships with other OCD organizations and mental health non-profits around the world.

The Foundation aims to improve outcomes for individuals with OCD and related disorders by providing resources and support for those affected by OCD, including individuals with OCD and related disorders, their family members, friends, and loved ones, promoting awareness about OCD and related disorders to the OCD community and the general public and increasing access to effective treatment through educating mental health professionals about evidence-based treatments providing a forum for professional collaboration and networking and finally, supporting research into the causes of and treatments for OCD and related disorders.




advertisement

 

Providers Clinical Support System

Providers Clinical Support System

Training is designed to increase the knowledge base and clinical proficiency of prescribers and providers from diverse multi-disciplinary healthcare backgrounds. An on-line curriculum includes training materials expanded from Providers’ Clinical Support System for Opioid Therapies (PCSS-O) and Physicians’ Clinical Support System for Buprenorphine (PCSS-B) to include significant additional content such as: patient selection and matching with treatment setting (residential, outpatient program,  office-based) and specific medications (methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone); practical guidelines for detoxification (both outpatient and inpatient); implementing antagonist-based treatment, managing long-term maintenance on medications; transitioning from agonist- to antagonist-based treatment; managing substance use and co-occurring psychiatric disorders; treatment of individuals with co-occurring medical problems and chronic pain; treatment in specialized populations such as adolescents, elderly, pregnant women, and those involved in veterans and criminal justice healthcare systems .




advertisement