Real Warriors

Real Warriors

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.
To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive website, mobile website and social media. The campaign features stories of real service members who reached out for psychological support or care with successful outcomes, including learning coping skills, maintaining their security clearance and continuing to succeed in their military or civilian careers. These Real Warriors are proving through example that reaching out is a sign of strength that benefits the entire military community.
In addition, the campaign encourages use of the DCoE Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.

There & Back

There & Back

There & Back Again is a non-profit reintegration program offered at no cost to veterans of all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Because of their combat service abroad, many veterans return home with a myriad of complex emotional issues, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). TABA offers a structured program of yoga, meditation and alternative approaches to healing the whole body to help veterans transition back to their lives stateside.

Our objective is teach veterans how to use breath awareness, meditation and yoga to manage their symptoms of PTSD, to improve their relationships with loved ones, to begin to fully participate in their lives, and to give back to their fellow veterans through TABA’s Train the Trainer program. TABA is comprised of respected professionals who are dedicated to the healing of our military men and women, and our program is based on both the latest research on the benefits of alternative therapies and staff and advisory board members’ personal successes managing symptoms of PTSD.

A multifaceted approach to wellness, including yoga, Reiki, acupuncture, meditation and other alternative therapies help empower veterans to manage their own challenges of reintegration.

There & Back Again incorporates a whole body approach to wellness.  Recognizing the three parts of our “self” – our mind/thoughts, our physical body and our emotional/spiritual self.  A combat experience is an extreme experience that can disconnect us from one or all of aspects of our “self.”  There & Back Again provides Veterans an opportunity to reconnect and reintegrate all parts of their “self.”

Many Veterans have found that these tools, along with traditional therapies, help them manage their challenges better allowing them to fully participate in their lives.

PsychoTube

PsychoTube

Free psychology videos dealing with a myriad of topics, from Mood Disorders to Cognitive Behavioral Therapies to Anxiety Disorders.  Also listed are clinical psychology, developmental psychology, therapy, learning psychology, cognitive psychology, memory and other forms of psychotherapies.  Psychotube is a new way to share video and audio clips with other psychology teachers.
Many psychology teachers use short video and audio clips to facilitate their teaching of psychology and this site provides a way of organizing these clips.

 

The majority of these videos are Youtube or TED talks, but are very interesting and well worth the views!  You may subscribe, view the amazingly full dictionary, or glossary or of course, view the videos!

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

Our Sponsor


Karla Smith Foundation

Karla Smith Foundation

Committing suicide is horrible.  It is a horrendous thing to think about someone not being around anymore, and not being able to see them anymore and not being a part of their lives.  Another thing that often goes unnoticed; however, is the ones suicide and grief will leave behind.

The Karla Smith Foundation offers the following services to family members and friends of those affected by mental illness and suicide. Support groups for family members of those with mental illness, Support groups for families coping with suicide grief,  Peer-to-peer coaching, Free education materials, Public awareness events, a local resource directory and financial aid when possible.

 

Sidran Institute

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Sidran began in 1986 out of a family tragedy when a beloved family member who had been abused in childhood was subsequently diagnosed with serious, debilitating psychiatric problems and a related life-threatening medical disorder. Frustrated in their search for help for the complex needs of their family member at the time, the Sidran family convened professionals from a variety of disciplines, support program representatives, and national organizations to determine how they could best help their own loved one, and others. With each meeting it became apparent that gaps in basic understanding existed in service delivery, continuity of care, public policy, and sound research.

Sidran’s constituency is made up of any individuals or organizations touched by the effects of trauma, including

• adults, adolescents, and children who have experienced or witnessed traumatic events,
• supportive friends and family members,
• health, mental health, crisis, public safety, and victims services professionals
• support networks, schools, faith communities, and more.

Suicide.Org

suicideorgSuicide.org explains that suicide is never the answer, but getting help IS the answer.

Ran by Kevin Caruso, Suicide.org’s mission is to prevent suicides, support suicide survivors, and educate the public about suicide.

Suicide.org conducts extensive work online and offline to further its mission of suicide prevention, awareness, and support.  We also run an online suicide survivors’ forum, which provides a safe place for suicide survivors to receive help.

And we work to remember and honor the angels who die by suicide in as many ways as we can, including online memorials.

And we work to spread awareness about suicide in as many ways as possible.

Offline, we give presentations about suicide, run suicide awareness campaigns, help schools establish effective suicide prevention and anti-bullying strategies, visit and call suicide survivors, and assist suicidal individuals.

 

Military Pathways Mental Health Screening

military pathwaysBeing in the military alone can be severely stressful.  Adding a family, or a war, or threat of war to the equation definitely makes it much more stressful.  This website is tied in with the United States Department of Defense and the nonprofit organization, Screening for Mental Health, who are trying to find via assessments if a military man or woman is experiencing traumatic events.

For instance, these assessments will help a person find out whether or not they might have some common mental health issues including, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, alcohol problems and more. Of course, just as with Psych Central, the screening will not provide a diagnosis – for that you need to see your own professional.   It will help point you towards a direction, tell you what you might have and where best you can seek assistance.

Best of all, your screening can be anonymous.  No one will come up and show your results and say this is Dr. Clyde’s results.  This will definitely help you if you feel you need the help.  Don’t wait any longer!