The Pacific Institute

The Pacific InstituteThe Pacific Institute® was co-founded by Lou and Diane Tice in 1971 in Seattle, Washington. After a period of rapid growth, in 1980 we expanded beyond the U.S. and Canada. To date we’ve served clients in over 60 countries and 22 languages.

Our educational programs have evolved over the years to leverage new formats and technologies; however their core principles remain the same. We’re steadfastly committed to empowering organizations and individuals to free themselves from self-imposed limitations, improve performance, and reach their full potential.

Over the past four decades our work has driven significant transformation, helping to establish infrastructure in post-apartheid South Africa and to foster peaceful discussions in Northern Ireland; empowering the education sector of Guatemala and the Mo tribe of Ghana; guiding Fortune 1000 companies down a path toward better productivity; and leading Olympic athletes to victory.

National Center for Victims of Crime

National Center for Victims of Crime

The mission of the National Center for Victims of Crime is to forge a national commitment to help victims of crime rebuild their lives. We are dedicated to serving individuals, families, and communities harmed by crime.
The National Center for Victims of Crime is a nonprofit organization that advocates for victims’ rights, trains professionals who work with victims, and serves as a trusted source of information on victims’ issues. After more than 25 years, we remain the most comprehensive national resource committed to advancing victims’ rights and helping victims of crime rebuild their lives.
The National Center is, at its core, an advocacy organization committed to — and working on behalf of — crime victims and their families. Rather than focus the entire organization’s work on one type of crime or victim, the National Center addresses all types of crime.

Psychonomic Society

Psychonomic Society

For over five decades, the Psychonomic Society has played a critical role in promoting scientific research in psychology and allied sciences. Understanding its beginnings are key to understanding the Society’s current position and how it plans to build on its tradition and transform certain aspects of its work to meet the evolving needs of its members and better serve the field over the next ten years.

However, psychology is a science that is constantly evolving, and the past ten years have seen dramatic changes and an expansion of the field, particularly at its juncture with neuroscience. New and more specialized societies have been created to focus on particular types of science, much as the Psychonomic Society was created in 1959. There has also been a dramatic shift for the Society as it embraced the modern publishing process, divested itself of its own publishing house, and contracted with Springer Publishing to produce its six journals. There was also a transition of Society management from internal staff to an external management firm. In addition, the publishing contract brought in a new and substantial revenue stream that has put the Psychonomic Society in a position to consider various new programs.

Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.

Our Sponsor

Social Anxiety Institute

Social Anxiety Institute

Dr. Thomas A. Richards currently runs all our treatment programs and is a leading clinical authority on the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Dr. Richards began seeing patients with social anxiety in the early 1990s and has seen thousands of patients since that time. The first CBT therapy group for social anxiety started in 1994. International therapy groups began in 1998.
Our emphasis is on treatment of social anxiety disorder (i.e., how do you get over it?) Our CBT therapy programs allow people to overcome social anxiety.
Cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder must be comprehensive and cover all aspects of social anxiety. Our groups are active, structured groups that work on anti-anxiety strategies on a daily, consistent basis. Cognitive therapy includes strategies to learn how to think and believe differently about ourselves. Behavioral therapy puts the cognitive strategies into place in your daily life.

Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.