Wing of Madness Depression Guide

Wing of Madness Depression Guide

This web page is about clinical depression, also referred to as major depression or major depressive disorder. Here we address not the “down” mood which we all get from time to time and which leads us to say, “I’m depressed,” but the often debilitating illness which affects one in five people, children as well as adults.

Clinical depression has many different facets, and affects not only someone’s mood, but often also their ability to function normally. Many depressed people experience impaired memory, difficulty concentrating, and confused thought processes. Some people experience what seems like unbearable noise or pain in their head which is purely mental (not the product of a headache, etc.). It can become impossible to speak or smile normally. Obviously, clinical depression is much more complicated than “the blues.”




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Mental Health Europe (MHE)

Mental Health Europe (MHE)

Mental Health Europe is an umbrella organization which represents associations, organizations and individuals active in the field of mental health and well-being in Europe, including (ex)users of mental health services, volunteers and professionals. As such, MHE bridges the gap between its 73 member organizations and the European institutions, and keeps its members informed and involved in any developments at European Union level.

MHE’s work takes different forms. As the main mental health organization active in Brussels, MHE is committed to advocating for its cause, whether this takes the form of submitting amendments to legislation, consulting with the European Commission, forming alliances with other organizations or being part of expert groups. Mental health Europe also develops and coordinates its own projects, conducts and disseminates research. Working to inform the general public on the plight of people with mental health problems, Mental Health Europe also cooperates closely with the media, and is often featured in prominent media outlets in Brussels and beyond.




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Center for Autism and Related Disabilities at USF (CARD)

Center for Autism and Related Disabilities at USF (CARD)

CARD’s work includes:
Developing and disseminating materials. Our materials are available online and in hard copy.
Developing and distributing an online newsletter two times a year. On a monthly basis, we send our CARD Connector, an online blast with educational and informational content for folks on our mailing list.
Organizing and conducting local, regional and statewide training events. Each year, regional workshops are organized on topics of great interest to families and school personnel.
Maintaining an active website. Families and professionals often access the web to gather information. Our website links to information and resources about autism and related disabilities, provides a list of training events, and other valuable information. The website is updated on a regular basis. CARD-USF also distributes information through our Facebook page and Twitter.
Engaging in individual consultations. CARD-USF offers families and/or professionals strategies or information on best practices to increase skill development or address behavioral concerns by observing the individual in natural settings, and collaborating with the person’s team and family members to suggest appropriate services and supports. Once our staff has determined the individual needs of a child or adult with ASD, we may provide direct consultation in a home, school or community setting.




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Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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Society for Research on Adolescence

Society for Research on Adolescence

As a community of researchers, our goals are to advance understanding of adolescence and enhance the wellbeing of youth in a globalized world. We promote high-quality research that considers the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of development in context. We aim to lead and shape scientific and public discourse on youth and adolescence, and to guide parenting, schooling, programs, and policies. In order to achieve these goals we foster the professional development and growth of all members, and are relevant, visible, diverse, and global in perspective.

  1. We value young people – their experiences and perspectives – and see them as critical to a better future.
  2. We value research as a foundation for raising children and for informing educational and community programs, practices and policies that shape the lives of youth.
  3. We value diversity of membership including national, cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, ability, and professional status.
  4. We value diversity in scholarship, including the study of diverse populations; disciplinary perspectives; and methodological approaches.



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Society for Research in Child Development

Society for Research in Child Development

The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) was founded in 1933 to “stimulate and support research, to encourage cooperation among individuals engaged in the scientific study of child development, and to encourage applications of research findings”. Since then, SRCD has remained at the forefront of developmental science, providing leadership for the field amid changing scientific and social contexts. Throughout the decades, the Society has maintained its commitment to the developing child as the primary focus of scientific inquiry and to the use of that science to improve child, family, and community well-being across diverse contexts.

SRCD faces a rapidly changing environment. Technological advances, the growth of interdisciplinary research in developmental science, and increased opportunities for international collaboration open promising new avenues for scientific discovery and application. Capitalizing on these opportunities to forge an integrative developmental science, however, will require bridging disciplinary silos and national borders, and will require increased diversity in research foci and in the scientific work force. Changes in funding structures, university systems, and research processes will likewise require adaptation and innovation if the research is to remain strong and vibrant. To enable SRCD to address unfolding challenges and to take advantage of emerging opportunities for developmental science and its application, SRCD initiated a strategic planning process to identify future Society directions.




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World Association for Infant Mental Health

World Association for Infant Mental Health

The World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH) is a not-for-profit organization for scientific and educational professionals.

WAIMH’s central aim is to promote the mental wellbeing and healthy development of infants throughout the world, taking into account cultural, regional, and environmental variations, and to generate and disseminate scientific knowledge.

More specifically, WAIMH seeks to facilitate:

Increased knowledge about mental development and disorder in children from conception to three years of age
The dissemination of scientific knowledge about services for care, intervention and prevention of mental disorder, and impairment in infancy
The dissemination of evidence-based knowledge about ways to support the developmental transition to parenthood, as well as the healthy aspects of parenting and caregiving environments
The international cooperation of professionals concerned with promoting the optimal development of infants, as well as the prevention and treatment of mental disorders in the early years
Aspects of research, education, and interventions in the above areas.




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1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.




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