Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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Society for Research on Adolescence

Society for Research on Adolescence

As a community of researchers, our goals are to advance understanding of adolescence and enhance the wellbeing of youth in a globalized world. We promote high-quality research that considers the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of development in context. We aim to lead and shape scientific and public discourse on youth and adolescence, and to guide parenting, schooling, programs, and policies. In order to achieve these goals we foster the professional development and growth of all members, and are relevant, visible, diverse, and global in perspective.

  1. We value young people – their experiences and perspectives – and see them as critical to a better future.
  2. We value research as a foundation for raising children and for informing educational and community programs, practices and policies that shape the lives of youth.
  3. We value diversity of membership including national, cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, ability, and professional status.
  4. We value diversity in scholarship, including the study of diverse populations; disciplinary perspectives; and methodological approaches.



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World Association for Infant Mental Health

World Association for Infant Mental Health

The World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH) is a not-for-profit organization for scientific and educational professionals.

WAIMH’s central aim is to promote the mental wellbeing and healthy development of infants throughout the world, taking into account cultural, regional, and environmental variations, and to generate and disseminate scientific knowledge.

More specifically, WAIMH seeks to facilitate:

Increased knowledge about mental development and disorder in children from conception to three years of age
The dissemination of scientific knowledge about services for care, intervention and prevention of mental disorder, and impairment in infancy
The dissemination of evidence-based knowledge about ways to support the developmental transition to parenthood, as well as the healthy aspects of parenting and caregiving environments
The international cooperation of professionals concerned with promoting the optimal development of infants, as well as the prevention and treatment of mental disorders in the early years
Aspects of research, education, and interventions in the above areas.




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Carly Marie Project Heal

Carly Marie Project Heal

If you are here because your heart is broken my hope for you is that you can begin to heal, grow and learn and that you can find the light that shines within you… it never goes out, it may dim at times, but like your soul, your light is eternal. May you find your light again and see that you are a real gift to this world. In time, I pray that you discover the gifts that your child has left for you in their short life. Just like every baby who is born healthy and alive, your child is a miracle and a true gift to you and this Earth.

With love and blessings to you,

CarlyMarie




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The Jung Page

The Jung Page

With the cooperation and generosity of analysts, academics, independent scholars and commentators, and the editors of several Jungian journals, The Jung Page provides a place to encounter innovative writers and to enter into a rich, ongoing conversation about psychology and culture.

It includes audio, articles, downloads, among other discussions about Jungian psychology and thoughts.  There are also resources and thoughts about Jung himself.




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National Alliance for Grieving Children

National Alliance for Grieving Children

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) provides a network for nationwide communication between hundreds of  professionals and volunteers who want to share ideas, information and resources with each other to better support the grieving children and families they serve in their own communities. Through this network, the NAGC offers online education, hosts an annual symposium on children’s grief, maintains a national data base of children’s bereavement support programs and promotes national awareness to enhance public sensitivity to the issues impacting grieving children and teens.

Located on this website is grants, symposiums, memberships, blogs, RSS feeds, activities, resources, discussions and support.




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Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.



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Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.




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