GirlsHealth.Gov

Girlshealth.gov was created in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office on Women’s Health (OWH) to help girls (ages 10 to 16) learn about health, growing up, and issues they may face. Girlshealth.gov promotes healthy and positive behaviors in girls, giving them reliable and useful health information in a fun, easy-to-understand way. The website also provides information to parents and educators to help them teach girls about healthy living.

Our tagline is “Be Happy. Be Healthy. Be You. Beautiful.” It focuses on the idea that being yourself — finding what makes you smile and how to live well — is what makes you “you.” And that is beautiful!

The Jed Foundation

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, and untreated mental health problems prevent thousands more students from graduating every year. The Jed Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization working to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among college students. The Jed Foundation’s programs are guided by an expert board of mental health professionals and target students, parents, colleges, the medical community, and the general public.

Explore this site to learn more about our work and how you can get involved in our efforts to help college students across the country.

Psychotherapy Brown Bag

Psychotherapy Brown Bag is an online magazine on the use of science in clinical psychology. Our goal is to facilitate conversations and provide information regarding effective treatments and recent research findings.

The New Face of Divorce: First Wives World

First Wives World is a private, secure environment for women going through separation, relationship challenges or divorce, providing support through social networking, forums, discussions, groups, resources and relevant news. Our core goal is to build a community of support to help women on their journey to recovery, and provide them the best resources, experts, mentors, tools and communities (both online and offline) required to move their lives forward with smarts, friendship and insight from a community who understands.

First Wives World is dedicated to supporting its members through the numerous life stages and challenges before them, as well as providing educated ways to set up a new life-plan moving forward. Through new tools, more organized resources and the first social network uniquely designed for divorced and divorcing women, we hope to create new ways for women to discuss divorce more openly with others going through exactly what they’re going through in a safe, private environment, with anonymity, and protected from the search engines.

Our Sponsor


Every Day Health

EverydayHealth.com is a leading provider of online health information. We’re here to help you manage your own and your family’s conditions and overall well-being through personalized advice, tools, and communities. We’re committed to bringing you the most credible and relevant health information available online, and to giving you the best possible user experience. Our information is easy to understand and incorporate into your life every day. There’s much to explore on EverydayHealth.com!

The Depravity Scale

Judges and juries both across the United States and in other countries who decide that a crime is “depraved,” “heinous,” or “horrible” can assign more severe sentences. Yet there is no standardized definition for such dramatic words that courts already use. And while we may all recognize that some crimes truly separate themselves from others, there is no standard, fair way to distinguish crimes that are the worst of the worst, or “evil.”

To minimize the arbitrariness of how courts determine the worst of crimes, and to eliminate bias in sentencing, the Depravity Scale research aims to establish societal standards of what makes a crime depraved, and to develop a standardized instrument based on specific characteristics of a crime that must be proven in order to merit more severe sentences.

This research will refine into the Depravity Standard, an objective measure based on forensic evidence. This instrument distinguishes not who is depraved but rather, what aspects of a given crime are depraved and the degree of a specific crime’s depravity. The research will enhance fairness in sentencing, given that it is race, gender and socio-economic blind.

The research has already been guided by legal and scientific study. Now, a two-part survey has been developed to involve the general public in establishing societal standards of what makes a crime depraved. The first part enables the general public to shape the specific intents, actions, and attitudes that should be included as items of the Depravity Standard instrument, and the second involves the general public in refining the relative weight of these items. In both surveys, all members of the general public are urged to participate. This is the first project ever developed that invites citizens’ direct input to forensic science research, and the first project ever developed in which citizens shape future criminal sentencing standards.

Synergy Services

Ending violence in our community requires a comprehensive approach of efforts to provide safe places for victims of violence, to empower survivors to rise above their circumstances and to educate the entire community.  Through integrated programs in the areas of residential services, clinical services and community education, Synergy touched more than 40,000 people last year.

Among Them:

  • Almost 1,300 women and children found refuge in our shelters, while our hotlines handled 4,456 calls.
  • Synergy’s therapists saw over 3,000 patients for a total of almost 7,000 individual sessions, 1,400 family sessions and 8,500 group sessions.
  • Over 20,000 people participated in our community education programs to empower and educate people to overcome or avoid violence.
  • Many others participated in mentoring programs, received help with court proceedings, or benefited from another of Synergy’s programs.

MinCAVA Electronic Clearinghouse

We are an online resource community only.  Our services are limited to electronic information delivery. We do not provide direct or emergency assistance for persons experiencing violence; therefore, we do not provide counseling services, financial assistance, or legal advice. Please contact your local service providers if you are seeking such assistance.

The Minnesota Center against Violence and Abuse (MinCAVA) has information on these subjects:  child abuse, domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, trafficking, workplace violence, youth violence and more.  Most information is in PDF form, but some are in regular text or web pages.