PhDStudent.Com

PhDStudent.Com

We also have hand-selected several bloggers to share their graduate school experiences with you. Our bloggers include current graduate students, a post doc and fellow, and an academic consultant to provide you with diverse perspectives from across the graduate school spectrum.

The PhD forums are another free resource we came up with to help connect past, current, and future grad students, providing you with an outlet to share your experiences and support one another. We’re also continuing to develop new tools to make your life a little easier (just remember to create a free account on our PhD People page to have full access to the tools!). For example, undergraduate and graduate students alike could benefit from submitting a question to Ask the PhDs, a Q&A column answered by faculty and industry PhDs about all facets of life in academia. Those who have completed grad school will especially want to check out our MyCV tool, which can eliminate the guesswork of formatting your curriculum vitae and increase your exposure by providing you with your personalized URL.

We could go on, but you probably get the idea: PhDStudent is a collection of diverse resources all packed into one site. We’re continually adding new articles and tools to stay up-to-date on the latest hot topics and trends in academia, so hopefully you’ve found what you’ve been looking for. Thanks for visiting, and see you around in the forums!

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

The Jung Page

The Jung Page

With the cooperation and generosity of analysts, academics, independent scholars and commentators, and the editors of several Jungian journals, The Jung Page provides a place to encounter innovative writers and to enter into a rich, ongoing conversation about psychology and culture.

It includes audio, articles, downloads, among other discussions about Jungian psychology and thoughts.  There are also resources and thoughts about Jung himself.

The Observer

The Observer

Published 10 times per year by the Association for Psychological Science, the Observer educates and informs the Association on matters affecting the research, academic, and applied disciplines of psychology; promotes the scientific values of APS Members; reports and comments on issues of national interest to the psychological scientist community; and provides a vehicle for the dissemination of information on APS.  For Non-Members, you may pay a short-time usage fee, or become a member.  For members of the APS, you log in with your account, and you can automatically read the Observer.

Our Sponsor


Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.

The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

Two young Swiss Psychiatrists, Christian Müller and Gaetano Benedetti, dissatisfied with the treatment of schizophrenia at the time, decided to gather together colleagues interested in the psychoanalytic treatment of schizophrenia. For the first 40 years of its existence the ISPS focused on organizing Symposiums every 3 years for clinicians to exchange ideas about their work. During these early years the ISPS acronym stood for the International Symposium for the Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia.

ISPS is an international organization promoting psychotherapy and psychological treatments for persons with psychosis. We are committed to advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders. We seek to achieve the best possible outcomes for service users by engaging in meaningful partnership with health professionals, service users, families and carers.