National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

NASP

School psychologists are uniquely qualified members of school teams that support students’ abilities to learn and teachers’ abilities to teach. They apply expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. School psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections among home, school, and the community.

The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) represents and supports the profession of school psychology by advancing effective practices to improve students’ learning, behavior and mental health and maintaining essential standards for ethics and practice.




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Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

The Center for Applications of Psychological Type, CAPT, was founded in 1975 by Isabel Briggs Myers and Dr. Mary McCaulley, but the seeds of its creation were planted six years earlier when those two women met for the first time.

In 1968, Mary McCaulley, a psychologist then on the faculty of the University of Florida Department of Clinical Psychology, discovered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator instrument in the Buros Mental Measurements Yearbook. She became fascinated with the Indicator and Jung’s concepts of type and began testing it with her students and clients.

Her growing interest in the MBTI instrument led Dr. McCaulley to contact Isabel Myers for information about a book mentioned in the MBTI Manual. The history of CAPT really began with the first conversation that took place between these two women. In the year that followed they corresponded regularly and were finally able to meet a year later in person.

The collaborative relationship between Mary McCaulley and Isabel Myers continued to grow over the next five years. It was during this time that they created the first computer scoring program for the MBTI instrument, conducted research studies of more than 3000 students, and developed the first training programs for professionals, teaching them how to use the Indicator.

By 1975, it became clear to both women that their growing type research and training programs warranted an educational center of its own—and the Center for Applications of Psychological Type was created. In its fledgling stage, CAPT began as a field office of the Medical Student Association Foundation, and four years later became an independent not for profit organization. CAPT has been located in Gainesville, Florida since its inception.

The MBTI instrument was originally published by Educational Testing Service (ETS). When ETS decided to no longer publish the MBTI instrument, it was important that another publisher be found. Mary McCaulley made contact with a psychologist at Stanford University, Jack Black, who had recently started a publishing company, CPP, Inc. In 1976 CPP became the new publisher for the Indicator. Today, the MBTI instrument is still published by CPP and has gone from a little known instrument to one that has gained worldwide acclaim.

CAPT has also flourished over the past thirty plus years, attracting a dynamic and devoted practitioner base, as the interest in and understanding of psychological type has grown. CAPT’s research data bank holds more than a million records from people who have taken the Indicator. The MBTI bibliography has more than 10,000 entries, and the Isabel Briggs Myers Memorial Library has developed into the largest collection of MBTI publications, dissertations and theses in the world.

Isabel Myers and Mary McCaulley met because of a shared interest in people, a fascination with the differences that make us unique, and a desire to understand how those differences can be used constructively to understand and appreciate others and ourselves. CAPT is committed to continuing the mission of these two extraordinary women—to learn more about and to teach the inherent value of our differences, those which make life, as Isabel Myers put it, “more amusing, more interesting and more of a daily adventure than it could possibly be if everyone were alike.”




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Professor Cottom’s Graduate School Guidance

Professor Cottom's Graduate School Guidance

Dear You,

 

So, you think you want to go to graduate school.

 

Whether you are considering a masters, doctoral, professional, research, or applied degree program, there are some things you need to consider.
I swore I’d never write this kind of guide because I believe there is a complicated calculus to choosing graduate school. Advice necessarily assumes to know who you are, your limitations, interests, values, talents, and circumstances. Mentoring, on the other hand, assumes none of these things and instead gets to know you before offering up suggestions for what you might do. Alas, I am one person and cannot always meet with you when you feel you need to the most. Therefore, I have assembled some considerations, possibilities, and norms related to graduate school admissions.




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Association for Psychological Type International

Association for Psychological Type International

As the independent voice for psychological type, we seek to promote human understanding through the transformative power of type. APTi is a global membership organization committed to advancing the responsible, constructive, and ethical use of personality type through education, training, research, networking, and community.

High Standards – Serving as the standard bearer for psychological type. Our standards serve as a beacon, lighting and enlightening our journey toward type expertise.

Organizational Sustainability – Creating an enduring and sustainable organization. Incorporating the best of our rich history as we build and sustain our future, as an organization.

Integrity – Aligning first with the mission and purpose of APTi over special interests. We optimize first for the interests of our total membership base and then maximize for membership segments.

Honoring Differences – Embracing, leveraging and learning from our diversity. More than just leveraging our diversity, we honor the gifts of each and all.

Community – Building knowledgeable and connected communities of type. The heart of our organization is our community, and our commitment is to continually offer enriching and enlightening opportunities and experiences.

Global Transformation – Unlocking the transformational power of the gifts of type throughout the world. We believe that our obligation to the world is to share the gifts of type and the possibilities those gifts create for the world.




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Midwestern Psychological Association

Midwestern Psychological Association

MPA is the oldest regional psychological association. It held its first meeting at Northwestern University in 1926. Presenters at the first meeting included Joseph Jastrow, Coleman Griffith and Clark Hull. MPA has held an annual meeting World since, except 1943-1945 because of political War political MPA has weathered political storms over the years including passing a resolution in 1939 condemning Hitler’s Nazi regime, moving the conference in 1952 to protest McCarthyism, and urging the removal of US troops from Vietnam in 1970. First and foremost, however, MPA has been an organization dedicated to psychological science. It has enjoyed the leadership of eminent past Presidents including B.F. Skinner, Harry Harlow, Robert Seashore, Paul Meehl, Donald Fiske, and Harvey Carr.




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Society for the Study of Social Problems

Society for the Study of Social Problems

SSSP members are an interdisciplinary community of scholars, practitioners, advocates, and students interested in the application of critical, scientific, and humanistic perspectives to the study of vital social problems. If you are involved in scholarship or action in pursuit of a just society nationally or internationally, you belong in the SSSP. You will meet others engaged in research to find the causes and consequences of social problems, as well as others seeking to apply existing scholarship to the formulation of social policies. Many members are social scientists by training. Many teach in colleges and universities. Increasing numbers work in applied research and policy settings. Membership is open to anyone who supports SSSP’s goals.




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Society for Research on Adolescence

Society for Research on Adolescence

As a community of researchers, our goals are to advance understanding of adolescence and enhance the wellbeing of youth in a globalized world. We promote high-quality research that considers the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of development in context. We aim to lead and shape scientific and public discourse on youth and adolescence, and to guide parenting, schooling, programs, and policies. In order to achieve these goals we foster the professional development and growth of all members, and are relevant, visible, diverse, and global in perspective.

  1. We value young people – their experiences and perspectives – and see them as critical to a better future.
  2. We value research as a foundation for raising children and for informing educational and community programs, practices and policies that shape the lives of youth.
  3. We value diversity of membership including national, cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, ability, and professional status.
  4. We value diversity in scholarship, including the study of diverse populations; disciplinary perspectives; and methodological approaches.



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Council on Undergraduate Research

Council on Undergraduate Research

The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and its affiliated colleges, universities, and individuals share a focus on providing undergraduate research opportunities for faculty and students at all institutions serving undergraduate students. CUR believes that faculty members enhance their teaching and contribution to society by remaining active in research and by involving undergraduates in research.

CUR’s leadership works with agencies and foundations to enhance research opportunities for faculty and students. CUR provides support for faculty development. Our publications and outreach activities are designed to share successful models and strategies for establishing and institutionalizing undergraduate research programs. We assist administrators and faculty members in improving and assessing the research environment at their institutions.

CUR also provides information on the importance of undergraduate research to state legislatures, private foundations, government agencies, and the U.S. Congress. CUR welcomes faculty and administrators from all academic institutions. Our primary advocacy is in support of faculty and undergraduate students engaged in research. CUR achieves its vision through efforts of its membership as organized in a divisional structure that includes arts and humanities, biology, chemistry, engineering, geosciences, health sciences, mathematics and computer science, physics and astronomy, psychology, social sciences, an at-large division that serves administrators and other disciplines, and a division for directors of undergraduate research programs.

Definition of Undergraduate Research: An inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate student that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline.

The Council on Undergraduate Research, founded in 1978, is a national organization of individual and institutional members representing over 900 colleges and universities.




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