MoodGYM

MoodGYM

The concept for MoodGYM and the content of the site were developed by the e-hub: e-mental Health Research and Development group at the Australian National University
MoodGYM is designed to be used by people who would like to prevent mental health problems or manage problems which are troubling but not incapacitating. MoodGYM is not specifically designed for use by people with clinical levels of depression or anxiety. MoodGYM suggests that those who score above 2-3 on the MoodGYM Depression Quiz should contact a health professional.




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Bite Back

Bite Back

BITE BACK is anonymous.
No real names: We like to be creative and make up fun and different usernames. Not only is it entertaining, it also has the added bonus of protecting everyone’s identity. It means everyone can share their stories and express themselves in their entries and comments with complete honesty.
Public posts or private? The choice is up to you. Every time you make an entry on BITE BACK, the upload form gives you the option to make your post public (with your username shown), private (just for your eyes), or public but without your username shown so no one knows which user posted it. There are bookshelves, things to do, think tanks, and mental fitness. It is such a complete user experience.




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Ryan Does Resi

Ryan Does Resi

Ryan Does Resi is a blog of Kim (the Ryan in the story) who has been doing residential treatment due to her eating disorder.  Kim’s style of dialect and and blogging are definitely a little strong for some, so caution is advised, but also, within all that verbiage and extra “attitude,” which is nice to have when there are issues a person is dealing with.

Ryan’s writing style is like sitting next to a friend, listening to a conversation.  It definitely helps you understand what a person might be feeling like when they have an eating disorder, in residency, or just a regular, human day.  Good read.




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Psychology.Org

Psychology.Org

We refocused our efforts to promoting psychology as a field, explicitly addressing its role in modern medicine, the humanities and social and scientific research. We wanted to make a site that engaged with two audiences: prospective students considering an education in psychology and job seekers, be they recent grads or professionals looking to advance their careers or return to school.

As you explore the site, you will recognize our effort to not only address these audiences, but to really show visitors what it takes to move from the classroom to the workforce, whether that be to clinical care, private practice or a corporate consultancy.

We’re excited to be a part of the movement advancing public knowledge of psychology. At this pivotal moment in the history of the discipline, we’re confident psychology.org is poised to make a lasting difference.




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Real Warriors

Real Warriors

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.

To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive website, mobile website and social media. The campaign features stories of real service members who reached out for psychological support or care with successful outcomes, including learning coping skills, maintaining their security clearance and continuing to succeed in their military or civilian careers. These Real Warriors are proving through example that reaching out is a sign of strength that benefits the entire military community.

In addition, the campaign encourages use of the DCoE Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.




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To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

It’s been nine years since Jamie posted the original TWLOHA story online, and we’re still here. We’re still working to let people know that hope is real and that they can get the help they deserve. Your story is important.

This began in the spring of 2006, when To Write Love on Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story about a friend struggling with depression, addiction, and self- injury. The words and the life it represented shed light on the reality of contrast—pain and peace, addiction and sobriety, regret and freedom. The title, “To Write Love on Her Arms,” also represented a goal—to believe that a better life was possible. A MySpace page was created to give the story a home, and T-shirts were sold to pay for the friend’s treatment.

As the days passed and the blog was shared, it became clear that this story was not just about one person. We heard from people longing to lift the heavy weight of depression, to be free from addiction or self-injury, to stay alive and live fully. We also heard from people mourning those they’d lost to such struggles, asking what they could do to bring hope to their communities. We learned that two out of three people who struggle with depression never seek help, and that untreated depression is the leading cause of suicide. In America alone, it’s estimated that 19 million people live with depression, and suicide is the third-leading cause of death among those 15-24 years old. It seemed we had stumbled into a bigger story, a conversation that needed to be had. These are issues of humanity, problems of pain that affect millions of people around the world, regardless of age, race, gender, religious belief, orientation, and background.

Over the years, TWLOHA has become much more than a blog and a T-shirt. Through musician support, tours, and social media, the message of hope and help has reached an audience broader than we could have ever anticipated. We’ve expanded from a computer screen to conferences, campuses, programs, and events around the country and the world, where we challenge the stigma and stereotypes that have surrounded mental health issues for so long. And we’re investing into treatment and recovery, offering financial support to organizations, centers, and individuals laboring in the priceless work of healing.

TWLOHA is honored to be a part of this continuing story, to invite people into the conversation, and to be a bridge to the better life we continue to believe is possible.




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American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

AFSP is a multifaceted organization made up of esteemed scientists, dedicated survivors of suicide loss, people with mental disorders and their families, and an expansive network of business and community leaders.

We are at once a grassroots movement, a support network, an educator, a professional research organization and a grant-making foundation. We organize hundreds of events in communities across the country, raising millions of dollars each year to support our work, both locally and nationally. We advocate for social change, supporting policies that contribute to reducing and preventing suicides nationwide. While AFSP does not provide direct services, such as counseling or running a crisis hotline, we do work closely with the organizations providing these services. Through these many roles, we reach hundreds of thousands of people every year. Increasingly, the media has turned to AFSP as their go-to source of expertise on suicide and its prevention. In collaboration with our volunteers and program participants, the following people help to make all of these things happen. To fully achieve its mission, AFSP engages in the following Five Core Strategies:

  • Fund scientific research
  • Offer educational programs for professionals
  • Educate the public about mood disorders and suicide prevention
  • Promote policies and legislation that impact suicide and prevention
  • Provide programs and resources for survivors of suicide loss and people at risk, and involve them in the work of the Foundation.

 




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Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists

Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists

AGLP (Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists):

 

  • Publish a quarterly newsletter (free to members)
  • Publish the quarterly Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, the official journal of the Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists, and provide a free subscription for all full, associate, early career, and medical student members;
  • Conduct a full schedule of seminars and discussion groups concurrent with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA);
  • Sponsor several awards honoring the accomplishments of people and organizations that contribute to the well-being of the LGBT community;
  • Sponsor social gatherings and a hospitality suite at the annual meeting of the APA and other psychiatric meetings;
  • Work within the APA to influence policies relevant to the lesbian and gay community;
  • Collaborate with other organizations of gay and lesbian physicians and mental health professionals;
  • Provide referral services for lesbian and gay patients;
  • Assist medical students and residents in their professional development;
  • Encourage and facilitate the presentation of programs and publications relevant to gay and lesbian concerns at professional meetings; and
  • Serve as liaison with other minority and advocacy groups within the psychiatric community.



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