Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.

Academy For Eating Disorders (AED)

Academy For Eating Disorders (AED)

The Academy for Eating Disorders is a global professional association committed to leadership in eating disorders research, education, treatment, and prevention. Our goal is to provide global access to knowledge, research and best treatment practice for eating disorders. For the public via its website, AED provides education on eating disorder symptoms and treatment recommendations.  AED helps researchers connect and collaborate with each other and keep abreast of recent developments in eating disorders research. . AED’s main event is the annual International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED), a scientific conference that spans research and education from basic science to the treating clinician; ICED is attended by leading international researchers and includes presentations and discussions on the cutting edge of research in the field. Media are invited to attend the ICED.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

Throughout human history, actors have made their living as entertainers – on stage, the big screen, small screen, even the computer screen. During our journeys, we sometimes encounter roles where the characters exhibit mental issues. Just a quick thought to the most memorable moments in movies and on television over the last century will provide you with many depictions of individuals exhibiting mental illness — almost all encountering seemingly insurmountable barriers.

As artists, what we learn as we become more knowledgeable about mental illness — its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment — is these barriers are not insurmountable and by stigmatizing those with mental illness, we are doing a grave injustice to them, ourselves and all of society.

Our goal is to educate the public about the wonderful possibilities that exist when we break down the societal barriers which hold us all back because we treat those afflicted with mental illness differently — we label them and isolate them. What we passionately want to accomplish is to relieve the weight of millions of people who suffer this isolation.

Carly Marie Project Heal

Carly Marie Project Heal

If you are here because your heart is broken my hope for you is that you can begin to heal, grow and learn and that you can find the light that shines within you… it never goes out, it may dim at times, but like your soul, your light is eternal. May you find your light again and see that you are a real gift to this world. In time, I pray that you discover the gifts that your child has left for you in their short life. Just like every baby who is born healthy and alive, your child is a miracle and a true gift to you and this Earth.

With love and blessings to you,

CarlyMarie

Our Sponsor


Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS)This website includes the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), including mental health services, and also Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons and Significant Others (JACS).  While located in New York, New York, this site does many things for those who are not anywhere near NYC.

It includes:  Programs and Services for Adults living with Mental Illness, Children and Adolescent Services, Community Services, and People Living With Developmental Disabilities, just to name a few.  There is also professional training, volunteering, and ways to donate and work for JBFCS.

Faith Trust Institute

Faith Trust Institute

FaithTrust is there to help when a person is worried about what to do when they are in an abusive situation and worried about crossing religious and cultural mores.  They have different religions listed, and are very willing to help!  It is important for the person in the abusive situation to leave as soon as possible, and this website will help them feel more comfortable doing so.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

 

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Don’t ever feel that it is hopeless.  Don’t ever give up.  There is always someone willing to listen,to talk to you and listen to what you have to say.    With the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, there is a free, 24 hour hotline you can call that will enable you to not feel that all is lost.  It will let you speak to others and understand that you are not alone and to help you along in life.  It is important to keep moving on in life–not to give up.   You can volunteer and donate here as well.  There are crisis centers for that, and most importantly, remember you can call anytime whenever you need help.  People are always here to help.  You are important, and you are worth the time, forever and a day.

National Alliance for Grieving Children

National Alliance for Grieving Children

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) provides a network for nationwide communication between hundreds of  professionals and volunteers who want to share ideas, information and resources with each other to better support the grieving children and families they serve in their own communities. Through this network, the NAGC offers online education, hosts an annual symposium on children’s grief, maintains a national data base of children’s bereavement support programs and promotes national awareness to enhance public sensitivity to the issues impacting grieving children and teens.

Located on this website is grants, symposiums, memberships, blogs, RSS feeds, activities, resources, discussions and support.