Health: Futures Without Violence

Health:  Futures Without Violence

For more than 30 years, FUTURES has been providing groundbreaking programs, policies, and campaigns that empower individuals and organizations working to end violence against women and children around the world.

Providing leadership from offices in San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston, we’ve established a state-of-the-art Center for Leadership and Action in the Presidio of San Francisco to foster ongoing dialogue about gender-based violence and child abuse.

Striving to reach new audiences and transform social norms, we train professionals such as doctors, nurses, judges, and athletic coaches on improving responses to violence and abuse. We also work with advocates, policy makers, and others to build sustainable community leadership and educate people everywhere about the importance of respect and healthy relationships.

Our vision is a future without violence that provides education, safety, justice, and hope.




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The Pacific Institute

The Pacific InstituteThe Pacific Institute® was co-founded by Lou and Diane Tice in 1971 in Seattle, Washington. After a period of rapid growth, in 1980 we expanded beyond the U.S. and Canada. To date we’ve served clients in over 60 countries and 22 languages.

Our educational programs have evolved over the years to leverage new formats and technologies; however their core principles remain the same. We’re steadfastly committed to empowering organizations and individuals to free themselves from self-imposed limitations, improve performance, and reach their full potential.

Over the past four decades our work has driven significant transformation, helping to establish infrastructure in post-apartheid South Africa and to foster peaceful discussions in Northern Ireland; empowering the education sector of Guatemala and the Mo tribe of Ghana; guiding Fortune 1000 companies down a path toward better productivity; and leading Olympic athletes to victory.




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iFred

iFred

The mission of International Foundation for Research and Education on Depression (iFred) is to shine a positive light on depression and eliminate the stigma associated with the disease through prevention, research and education. Its goal is to ensure 100% of the 350 million people affected by depression seek and receive treatment.

iFred is creating a shift in society’s negative perception of depression through positive imagery and branding—establishing the sunflower and color yellow as the international symbols of hope for depression. To further its mission, iFred engages with individuals and organizations to execute high-impact and effective campaigns that educate the public about support and treatment for depression.




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Real Warriors

Real Warriors

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.

To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive website, mobile website and social media. The campaign features stories of real service members who reached out for psychological support or care with successful outcomes, including learning coping skills, maintaining their security clearance and continuing to succeed in their military or civilian careers. These Real Warriors are proving through example that reaching out is a sign of strength that benefits the entire military community.

In addition, the campaign encourages use of the DCoE Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.




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To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

It’s been nine years since Jamie posted the original TWLOHA story online, and we’re still here. We’re still working to let people know that hope is real and that they can get the help they deserve. Your story is important.

This began in the spring of 2006, when To Write Love on Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story about a friend struggling with depression, addiction, and self- injury. The words and the life it represented shed light on the reality of contrast—pain and peace, addiction and sobriety, regret and freedom. The title, “To Write Love on Her Arms,” also represented a goal—to believe that a better life was possible. A MySpace page was created to give the story a home, and T-shirts were sold to pay for the friend’s treatment.

As the days passed and the blog was shared, it became clear that this story was not just about one person. We heard from people longing to lift the heavy weight of depression, to be free from addiction or self-injury, to stay alive and live fully. We also heard from people mourning those they’d lost to such struggles, asking what they could do to bring hope to their communities. We learned that two out of three people who struggle with depression never seek help, and that untreated depression is the leading cause of suicide. In America alone, it’s estimated that 19 million people live with depression, and suicide is the third-leading cause of death among those 15-24 years old. It seemed we had stumbled into a bigger story, a conversation that needed to be had. These are issues of humanity, problems of pain that affect millions of people around the world, regardless of age, race, gender, religious belief, orientation, and background.

Over the years, TWLOHA has become much more than a blog and a T-shirt. Through musician support, tours, and social media, the message of hope and help has reached an audience broader than we could have ever anticipated. We’ve expanded from a computer screen to conferences, campuses, programs, and events around the country and the world, where we challenge the stigma and stereotypes that have surrounded mental health issues for so long. And we’re investing into treatment and recovery, offering financial support to organizations, centers, and individuals laboring in the priceless work of healing.

TWLOHA is honored to be a part of this continuing story, to invite people into the conversation, and to be a bridge to the better life we continue to believe is possible.




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Videos on Psychological Trauma–Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Videos on Psychological Trauma--Cavalcade Productions, Inc.

Since 1989, Cavalcade has specialized in producing training videos for therapists and other professionals working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma. Our most popular programs include The Traumatized Child, which describes the effects of abuse and neglect on children, and their needs at home and in school, The ACE Study, which outlines the impact of childhood trauma, neglect, and household dysfunction on adult physical health, and Vicarious Traumatization, which explores the cumulative impact of trauma clients’ stories on care workers. Trauma and Dissociation in Children, which gives child protection professionals a grounding in the psychological impacts of abuse, and provides them with better tools for working with traumatized children, was released in 2007, and was given the APSAC Media Award in June, 2008. In November of 2000, we received the Audio-Visual Media Achievement Award from the International Society for the Study of Dissociation.
Our involvement in child abuse issues began in 1975 with the production of Don’t Give Up On Me, an award-winning training film for social workers dealing with physical abuse cases. This was followed by The Last Taboo, about child sexual abuse, and Double Jeopardy, which examines the plight of the child sexual abuse victim/witness in the criminal justice system.
Cavalcade was founded as a film production company in 1948. Our clients have included DeKalb AgResearch, the American Saddle Horse Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Three of our films won the CINE Golden Eagle, awarded to motion pictures chosen to represent the United States in film festivals abroad. Water, an environmental documentary, received the U.S. Industrial Film Festival Gold Camera, the IFPA Silver Cindy, the Chris Award, and the N.Y. International Film Festival Bronze Medal.




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1 in 6

1 in 6Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 18. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non-contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.
If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.
If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.




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Minds on the Edge

Minds on the Edge

The one-hour television program zeros in on wrenching and confounding situations that are playing out every day in homes and hospital ERs, on city streets and school campuses, in courtrooms and in jails, as Americans struggle with the challenges of severe mental illness.

Produced for PBS by the Fred Friendly Seminars using their signature format of a hypothetical scenario, the program considers the case of a college student who develops mental illness while at school. Her professor knows something is wrong, but is unsure how to approach her and whether it is even legal to contact her parents. Upset and confused when they see their daughter, her parents do not know where to turn and are shocked to discover how limited their options are when they try to seek medical help.

The program also explores the circumstances of an adult who has coped with his mental illness until his mother dies, and then he is left without critical support. As his mental health unravels, and he is unable to get treatment or maintain his home, he is arrested for a minor crime and absorbed into the criminal justice system. For him it is the beginning of a merry-go-round of homelessness and jail that has become all too common for many individuals who are living with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.




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