National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National TSA has 2 full-time Information and Referral Coordinators with professional backgrounds in social work, psychology, education or related disciplines who answer email and telephone inquiries. We get requests for referrals to physicians or therapists (TSA maintains lists by state for Physicians and Allied Professionals as well as legal resources and various camps and schools). There are questions about Education-related issues (e.g. from teachers for pointers in the classroom, or from parents about teachers’ handling of symptoms in the classroom). Parents may be seeking options to better educate school personnel. Other requests for assistance are those seeking information about symptoms of TS and co-occurring disorders, treatment options, Social Security and Disability, ADA, and TS resources.  They may help with referral by email or telephone.  See the website for more information.

 

Social Anxiety Institute

Social Anxiety Institute

Dr. Thomas A. Richards currently runs all our treatment programs and is a leading clinical authority on the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Dr. Richards began seeing patients with social anxiety in the early 1990s and has seen thousands of patients since that time. The first CBT therapy group for social anxiety started in 1994. International therapy groups began in 1998.
Our emphasis is on treatment of social anxiety disorder (i.e., how do you get over it?) Our CBT therapy programs allow people to overcome social anxiety.
Cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder must be comprehensive and cover all aspects of social anxiety. Our groups are active, structured groups that work on anti-anxiety strategies on a daily, consistent basis. Cognitive therapy includes strategies to learn how to think and believe differently about ourselves. Behavioral therapy puts the cognitive strategies into place in your daily life.

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

No Kidding, Me Too! is a 501(c)(3) public charity, whose purpose is to remove the stigma attached to brain dis-ease (BD) through education and the breaking down of societal barriers. Our goal is to empower those with BD to admit their illness, seek treatment, and become even greater members of society.

Our Sponsor


Discovering Psychology

Discovering Psychology

Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body.

PsychoTube

PsychoTube

Free psychology videos dealing with a myriad of topics, from Mood Disorders to Cognitive Behavioral Therapies to Anxiety Disorders.  Also listed are clinical psychology, developmental psychology, therapy, learning psychology, cognitive psychology, memory and other forms of psychotherapies.  Psychotube is a new way to share video and audio clips with other psychology teachers.
Many psychology teachers use short video and audio clips to facilitate their teaching of psychology and this site provides a way of organizing these clips.

 

The majority of these videos are Youtube or TED talks, but are very interesting and well worth the views!  You may subscribe, view the amazingly full dictionary, or glossary or of course, view the videos!

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

Minds on the Edge

Minds on the edgeMINDS ON THE EDGE: Facing Mental Illness is a multi-platform media project that explores severe mental illness in America.

The centerpiece of the project was a television program that aired on PBS stations in October 2009. This video component was part of a national initiative that includes extensive web content with tools for civic engagement, active social media on Facebook and Twitter, and an ambitious strategy to engage citizens, professionals in many fields, and policy makers at all levels of government. The goal was to advance consensus about how to improve the kinds of support and treatment available for people with mental illness.