Learn to Cope

Learn to Cope

Joanne Peterson is the Founder and Executive Director of Learn to Cope (LTC), a non-profit peer-led support network which began in 2004. Mrs. Peterson’s journey started as a young girl with siblings experiencing issues with mental illness and addiction. Years later when Joanne discovered that her own son’s experimentation with prescription drugs led to an opioid addiction, she was motivated and empowered to use her voice to bring about change. Today her son is in long term recovery. She designed LTC to offer families the support, education, resources and hope that her family would have benefited from.

 

Funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MADPH), LTC has grown to have a full-staff who collaborate with communities across the state to spread messages of prevention, education, awareness and advocacy. Learn to Cope has over 9,000 members on a private online forum, 25 chapters throughout Massachusetts and most recently 2 chapters in Florida and 1 in Boise, Idaho. LTC families receive unique support and education from professionals and their peers. Through advocacy and awareness, Mrs. Peterson collaborated with MADPH to become the first parent network in the country to provide the overdose reversal antidote nasal Naloxone. Today, 80 of the 200 LTC facilitators are trained and certified to provided overdose education and nasal naloxone kits at each chapter. Since December of 2011 there have been over 100 documented successful reversals by LTC members.

 

With the growth and expansion of LTC, Mrs. Peterson has been called upon by high level government officials, law enforcement, and educators to assist in their efforts to combat the opioid epidemic. In 2015 Mrs. Peterson was one of the recipients of the Advocate for Action award from the Office of National Drug Control Policy and was also Senator Markey’s guest at the State of the Union Address. In March 2016, Mrs. Peterson was asked by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker to participate as a panelist for the National Governors Association Health and Human Services Committee to discuss the Nation’s opioid crisis. Most recently, Mrs. Peterson was invited to the West Wing to participate in a discussion held by Michael Botticelli, the National Drug Control Policy Director, on the Administration’s efforts to address the country’s opioid epidemic. Currently, Mrs. Peterson sits on the Massachusetts Health and Human Services Emergency Department Boarding Work Group, as well as the Governor’s Special Commission to Study Licensed Addiction Treatment Centers.




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Clubhouse International

Clubhouse International>We help start and grow Clubhouses globally where people with mental illness can go to get their lives back.

There simply are not enough resources today for everyone with a mental illness who needs help. It’s a crisis situation and the numbers are growing.

Clubhouses powerfully demonstrate that people with mental illness can and do lead productive, happy lives. Each Clubhouse we open reaches +/- 500 people in need!  Clubhouse International has succeeded in creating something that didn’t exist before: A worldwide community that is changing the world of mental health. Through over 320 local Clubhouses around the world, we offer people living with mental illness opportunities for friendship, employment, housing, education and access to medical and psychiatric services in a single caring and safe environment – so they can recover and fully participate as valued and respected members of society.




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American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

AACAP partners with our members in advocacy efforts at the federal and state levels to improve policies and services for children and adolescents with mental illness. We work to educate policymakers and administrators about issues affecting child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health and regularly engage our members on pertinent legislation and regulatory activities. AACAP continually develops resources for members to use as they communicate with policymakers about issues related to child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health. Make your voice heard on behalf of children with mental illness! Through AACAP’s Legislative Action Center, you can take action on our current federal advocacy alerts, correspond with your members of Congress and the Administration, and contact your local media. And AACAP sends regular advocacy updates and action alerts to keep members updated on federal and state legislation and provide opportunities to get involved. Click here to read past updates and alerts.




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CHADD–The National Resource On ADHD

CHADD--The National Resource On ADHD

Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) was founded in 1987 in response to the frustration and sense of isolation experienced by parents and their children with ADHD. At that time, one could turn to very few places for support or information. Many people seriously misunderstood ADHD. Many clinicians and educators knew little about the disability, and individuals with ADHD were often mistakenly labeled “a behavior problem,” “unmotivated,” or “not intelligent enough.”

ADHD is medically and legally recognized as a treatable yet potentially serious disorder, affecting up to nine percent of all children, and approximately four percent of adults.

Today, children with ADHD are eligible for special education services or accommodations within the regular classroom when needed, and adults with ADHD may be eligible for accommodations in the workplace under the Americans with Disabilities Act. CHADD is a success story, inspired by the desire of countless parents to see their children with ADHD succeed. From one parent support group in Florida, the organization grew dramatically to become the leading non-profit national organization for children and adults with ADHD.

The organization has a small national staff, which manages the day-to-day responsibilities, while its Board of Directors sets policy and oversees the organization’s well being. The organization is composed of dedicated volunteers from around the country who play an integral part in the association’s success by providing support, education and encouragement to parents, educators and professionals on a grassroots level through CHADD chapters. Along with its growth in membership and reputation, CHADD has retained the passion and commitment of its founders.




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National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health

National Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health

The National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health is a national family-run organization linking more than 120 chapters and state organizations focused on the issues of children and youth with emotional, behavioral, or mental health needs and their families. It was conceived in Arlington, Virginia in February, 1989 by a group of 18 people determined to make a difference in the way the system works.  Members of the National Federation come from all walks of life. Emotional, behavioral or mental health needs cut across all income, educational, geographical, racial, ethnic, and religious groups. They are found among single parents and two-parent families and in birth, adoptive, and foster families.




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Alternative Considerations Of Jonestown & People’s Temple

Alternative Considerations Of Jonestown & People's Temple

Welcome to “Alternative Considerations of Jonestown and Peoples Temple,” sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies at San Diego State University. This website is designed to give personal and scholarly perspectives on a major event in the history of religion in America. Its primary purpose is to present information about Peoples Temple as accurately and objectively as possible. In an effort to be impartial, we offer many diverse views and opinions about the Temple and the events in Jonestown.

We hope that visitors to the site will come away with an understanding that the story of Jonestown did not start or end on 18 November 1978.




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World Of Statistics

World Of Statistics

The World of Statistics—the successor to the highly successful International Year of Statistics (Statistics2013) campaign celebrated in 2013—is a global network of nearly 2,360 organizations worldwide committed to: increasing public awareness of the power and impact of statistics on all aspects of society, nurturing statistics as a profession, especially among young people and promoting creativity and development in the sciences of probability and statistics.

Why is statistics important? The short answer is that the science of statistics has powerful and far-reaching effects on everyone, yet most people are unaware of their connection to statistics—from the foods we eat to the medicines we take, to the air we breathe to the bridges we cross each day—and how statistics improve their lives.

The World of Statistics website promotes these goals by providing regular blogs on applications of statistics that are bettering our lives, information about the many interesting and rewarding careers in statistics, and up-to-date information on statistically related events and activities worldwide.

Participating organizations in The World of Statistics include national and international professional statistical societies, colleges and universities, primary and secondary schools, businesses, government statistical agencies, and research institutes. These organizations are located in 131 countries spanning the globe.




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Providers Clinical Support System

Providers Clinical Support System

Training is designed to increase the knowledge base and clinical proficiency of prescribers and providers from diverse multi-disciplinary healthcare backgrounds. An on-line curriculum includes training materials expanded from Providers’ Clinical Support System for Opioid Therapies (PCSS-O) and Physicians’ Clinical Support System for Buprenorphine (PCSS-B) to include significant additional content such as: patient selection and matching with treatment setting (residential, outpatient program,  office-based) and specific medications (methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone); practical guidelines for detoxification (both outpatient and inpatient); implementing antagonist-based treatment, managing long-term maintenance on medications; transitioning from agonist- to antagonist-based treatment; managing substance use and co-occurring psychiatric disorders; treatment of individuals with co-occurring medical problems and chronic pain; treatment in specialized populations such as adolescents, elderly, pregnant women, and those involved in veterans and criminal justice healthcare systems .




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