American Academy of Clinical Psychology

American Academy of Clinical Psychology

The American Academy of Clinical Psychology was founded in 1993. It is the membership organization of Board Certified specialists in Clinical Psychology. It endeavors to provide member services, to promote high standards for services by clinical psychologists, to promote the value and recognition of Board Certification in Clinical Psychology, and to encourage those qualified by training and experience to become candidates for Board Certification.

It’s mission is to recognize and promote advanced competence within the specialty of Clinical Psychology; to provide a professional community that encourages communication between and among Fellows of the Academy; to provide opportunities for advanced education in clinical psychology; to expand awareness and availability of board certified clinical psychologists to the public through promotional and educational activities and of course finally to work collaboratively with the American Board of Clinical Psychology.




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The Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

The Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB)

ASPPB is the association of psychology licensing boards in the United States and Canada. Formed in 1961, ASPPB creates the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP), which is used by licensing boards to assess candidates for licensure and certification. ASPPB also offers several mobility programs to assist in licensure of psychologists already licensed in another state, province, or territory, and also publishes materials for training programs and for students preparing to enter the profession.

Our mission is to enhance services and support its member jurisdictions in fulfilling their goal of advancing public protection by offering exemplary examination and credentialing programs, providing state of the art programs and services to all our stakeholders, serving as the source for the most current and accurate information about the regulation of psychologists and contributing to the critical consumer protection perspective in the on-going development of the profession.




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EPsych

EPsych

Welcome to the worlds of ePsych. This exotic place is devoted to the study of psychology, the science of behavior and the mind. I am Brasha-san and, like you, am a student of psychology. Although I have studied the subject for many years, I still find it complicated, bewildering, confusing, maddening, at times even unbelievable. But psychology is also wonderful, beautiful, and glorious!

Without a doubt, psychology is the most personal of all the sciences. It is the science of you and me and all the other people and creatures we interact with throughout our lives. When you learn about psychology, you will discover how people are able to perform seemingly impossible activities with ease, and why they sometimes stumble on the simplest of tasks.

 




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Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT)

The Center for Applications of Psychological Type, CAPT, was founded in 1975 by Isabel Briggs Myers and Dr. Mary McCaulley, but the seeds of its creation were planted six years earlier when those two women met for the first time.

In 1968, Mary McCaulley, a psychologist then on the faculty of the University of Florida Department of Clinical Psychology, discovered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator instrument in the Buros Mental Measurements Yearbook. She became fascinated with the Indicator and Jung’s concepts of type and began testing it with her students and clients.

Her growing interest in the MBTI instrument led Dr. McCaulley to contact Isabel Myers for information about a book mentioned in the MBTI Manual. The history of CAPT really began with the first conversation that took place between these two women. In the year that followed they corresponded regularly and were finally able to meet a year later in person.

The collaborative relationship between Mary McCaulley and Isabel Myers continued to grow over the next five years. It was during this time that they created the first computer scoring program for the MBTI instrument, conducted research studies of more than 3000 students, and developed the first training programs for professionals, teaching them how to use the Indicator.

By 1975, it became clear to both women that their growing type research and training programs warranted an educational center of its own—and the Center for Applications of Psychological Type was created. In its fledgling stage, CAPT began as a field office of the Medical Student Association Foundation, and four years later became an independent not for profit organization. CAPT has been located in Gainesville, Florida since its inception.

The MBTI instrument was originally published by Educational Testing Service (ETS). When ETS decided to no longer publish the MBTI instrument, it was important that another publisher be found. Mary McCaulley made contact with a psychologist at Stanford University, Jack Black, who had recently started a publishing company, CPP, Inc. In 1976 CPP became the new publisher for the Indicator. Today, the MBTI instrument is still published by CPP and has gone from a little known instrument to one that has gained worldwide acclaim.

CAPT has also flourished over the past thirty plus years, attracting a dynamic and devoted practitioner base, as the interest in and understanding of psychological type has grown. CAPT’s research data bank holds more than a million records from people who have taken the Indicator. The MBTI bibliography has more than 10,000 entries, and the Isabel Briggs Myers Memorial Library has developed into the largest collection of MBTI publications, dissertations and theses in the world.

Isabel Myers and Mary McCaulley met because of a shared interest in people, a fascination with the differences that make us unique, and a desire to understand how those differences can be used constructively to understand and appreciate others and ourselves. CAPT is committed to continuing the mission of these two extraordinary women—to learn more about and to teach the inherent value of our differences, those which make life, as Isabel Myers put it, “more amusing, more interesting and more of a daily adventure than it could possibly be if everyone were alike.”




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National Institutes of Mental Health

National Institutes of Mental Health

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the lead Federal agency for research on mental illnesses. The mission of the NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.
The urgency of this mission arises from the public health burden. According to recent estimates, mental illnesses account for 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability in the United States. An estimated 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI) in which the ability to function in daily life is significantly impaired. Those with SMI die 10 years earlier than individuals in the general population, on average. Furthermore, over 41,149 Americans die each year from suicide, more than twice the annual mortality from homicide or AIDS. Beyond the morbidity and mortality, a conservative estimate places the direct and indirect financial costs associated with mental illnesses in the United States at well over $300 billion annually. Mental illnesses rank as the third most costly medical conditions in terms of overall health care expenditure, behind heart conditions and traumatic injury.




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Society for Research on Adolescence

Society for Research on Adolescence

As a community of researchers, our goals are to advance understanding of adolescence and enhance the wellbeing of youth in a globalized world. We promote high-quality research that considers the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of development in context. We aim to lead and shape scientific and public discourse on youth and adolescence, and to guide parenting, schooling, programs, and policies. In order to achieve these goals we foster the professional development and growth of all members, and are relevant, visible, diverse, and global in perspective.

  1. We value young people – their experiences and perspectives – and see them as critical to a better future.
  2. We value research as a foundation for raising children and for informing educational and community programs, practices and policies that shape the lives of youth.
  3. We value diversity of membership including national, cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic, ability, and professional status.
  4. We value diversity in scholarship, including the study of diverse populations; disciplinary perspectives; and methodological approaches.



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The Pacific Institute

The Pacific InstituteThe Pacific Institute® was co-founded by Lou and Diane Tice in 1971 in Seattle, Washington. After a period of rapid growth, in 1980 we expanded beyond the U.S. and Canada. To date we’ve served clients in over 60 countries and 22 languages.

Our educational programs have evolved over the years to leverage new formats and technologies; however their core principles remain the same. We’re steadfastly committed to empowering organizations and individuals to free themselves from self-imposed limitations, improve performance, and reach their full potential.

Over the past four decades our work has driven significant transformation, helping to establish infrastructure in post-apartheid South Africa and to foster peaceful discussions in Northern Ireland; empowering the education sector of Guatemala and the Mo tribe of Ghana; guiding Fortune 1000 companies down a path toward better productivity; and leading Olympic athletes to victory.




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Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation is committed to alleviating the suffering caused by mental illness by awarding grants that will lead to advances and breakthroughs in scientific research.

100% of all donor contributions for research are invested in NARSAD GRANTS leading to discoveries in understanding causes and improving treatments of disorders in children and adults, such as depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, autism, and bipolar, attention-deficit hyperactivity, post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

Over a quarter of a century, we have awarded over $328 million worldwide to more than 3,700 scientists carefully selected by our prestigious Scientific Council.

Our vision:
To bring the joy of living to those affected by mental illness – those who are ill and their loved ones.

Our values:
What we believe:

  • Better treatments and breakthroughs come from scientific discovery.
  • Only fund scientists whose research is reviewed and recommended by a world-renowned Scientific Council including Nobel prize winners and chairs of psychiatric departments.
  • 100% of contributions for research go directly to research. Costs for administration and fund raising are underwritten by outside grants.
  • Our financial operations must be transparent. Those who manage our Foundation must be committed to honesty and integrity.
  • Strategic partnerships that further our mission will be developed with transparency.



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