American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology

American Society of Clinical PsychopharmacologyThe American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology is headquartered in the United States and has meetings three times a year.  It also has a journal, The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, and also has developed a Model Curriculum in Psychology, now in its’ 7th adaptation.  There are also resources and a clinical trial workshop as well.

International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)

 

International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)
ICSA’s mission is to apply research and professional perspectives to:

  • Help those who have been spiritually abused or otherwise harmed by psychological manipulation and high-demand groups
  • Educate the public
  • Promote and conduct research
  • Support helping professionals interested in cults, related groups, and psychological manipulation.

World Psychiatric Association

World Psychiatric AssociationThe WPA is an association of national psychiatric societies aimed to increase knowledge and skills necessary for work in the field of mental health and the care for the mentally ill. Its member societies are presently 135, spanning 117 different countries and representing more than 200,000 psychiatrists.

The WPA organizes the World Congress of Psychiatry every three years. It also organizes international and regional congresses and meetings, and thematic conferences. It has 65 scientific sections, aimed to disseminate information and promote collaborative work in specific domains of psychiatry. It has produced several educational programs and series of books.

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National TSA has 2 full-time Information and Referral Coordinators with professional backgrounds in social work, psychology, education or related disciplines who answer email and telephone inquiries. We get requests for referrals to physicians or therapists (TSA maintains lists by state for Physicians and Allied Professionals as well as legal resources and various camps and schools). There are questions about Education-related issues (e.g. from teachers for pointers in the classroom, or from parents about teachers’ handling of symptoms in the classroom). Parents may be seeking options to better educate school personnel. Other requests for assistance are those seeking information about symptoms of TS and co-occurring disorders, treatment options, Social Security and Disability, ADA, and TS resources.  They may help with referral by email or telephone.  See the website for more information.

 

Our Sponsor


Social Anxiety Institute

Social Anxiety Institute

Dr. Thomas A. Richards currently runs all our treatment programs and is a leading clinical authority on the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Dr. Richards began seeing patients with social anxiety in the early 1990s and has seen thousands of patients since that time. The first CBT therapy group for social anxiety started in 1994. International therapy groups began in 1998.
Our emphasis is on treatment of social anxiety disorder (i.e., how do you get over it?) Our CBT therapy programs allow people to overcome social anxiety.
Cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder must be comprehensive and cover all aspects of social anxiety. Our groups are active, structured groups that work on anti-anxiety strategies on a daily, consistent basis. Cognitive therapy includes strategies to learn how to think and believe differently about ourselves. Behavioral therapy puts the cognitive strategies into place in your daily life.

NADD (National Association for the Dually Diagnosed)

NADD (National Association for the Dually Diagnosed)

NADD, also known as The National Association for the Dually Diagnosed, was founded in 1983 as a not-for-profit Association. The catalyst for the founding of NADD arose from the need for an open forum to promote and exchange of ideas, principals & concepts concerning individuals who have the co-existence of  ID/D and mental illness.

NADD has been growing at a steady pace since its inception. We are now recognized as the leading organization providing conferences, educational services and training materials to many thousands of people in the United States and world-wide. Through the dissemination of cutting edge knowledge, we have been influential in the development of appropriate community based policies, programs, and opportunities in addressing the mental health needs of persons who have ID/D.

NADD has been successful in promoting services that bridge the gap between the mental health and developmental disabilities structures. The division of responsibility between the mental health and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities service systems has resulted all too often in a denial of comprehensive care and treatment for individuals who have ID/D concurrent with a serious mental health problem. NADD is a national leading force advocating on behalf of individuals who have mental illness and ID/D.

NADD has grown rapidly since its founding in 1983 and is now represented in every state in the United States and in Canada, Australia, Japan as well as in Europe.

Mental Health.Gov

Laugh! It's Serious Business!

The President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence directs the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education to launch a national dialogue on mental health with young people who have experienced mental health problems, members of the faith community, foundations, and school and business leaders. The national dialogue, which MentalHealth.gov is a part of, will take place through:

  1. Community conversations. Several geographically/demographically diverse cities will host structured conversations facilitated by deliberative democracy groups that will result in community specific action plans. Other communities may choose to use SAMHSA’s Toolkit for Community Conversations About Mental Health to help host their own conversations.
  2. Public/private partnership commitments. Outside groups such as national associations of schools, colleges and universities, faith based groups, medical providers, and others are being asked to commit to including some form of mental health awareness or discussion in their upcoming activities. The idea is that this form of conversation will reach communities that aren’t limited to geographic designations, but are communities of likeminded citizens (i.e. teachers, churchgoers etc) across the country. When layered on top of the cities hosting the facilitated conversations, the dialogue begins to have a nationwide reach.
  3. Social and online media. HHS will launch MentalHealth.gov as an online resource for people looking for information about signs of mental health problems, how individuals can seek help, and how communities can host conversations on mental health. The website will include videos of people who share their stories about mental health problems and recovery.

No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

No Kidding, Me Too! is a 501(c)(3) public charity, whose purpose is to remove the stigma attached to brain dis-ease (BD) through education and the breaking down of societal barriers. Our goal is to empower those with BD to admit their illness, seek treatment, and become even greater members of society.