International Positive Psychology Association

International Positive Psychology Association

Positive psychology is an exciting new field of inquiry that has captured the interest of thousands of researchers, practitioners, and students from around the world. This burgeoning area of psychology focuses on the study and practice of the positive emotions, strengths, and virtues that make individuals and institutions thrive. Since its inception in 1998, the field has seen an investment of tens of millions of dollars in research, the founding of several scientific journals, the development of masters, and Ph.D. programs in key universities, and reports in major news outlets (including cover stories in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News & World Report). In addition, the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) – in just four years of existence – has grown to thousands of members from 80 countries!

IPPA has several related missions. First, IPPA wants to further the science of positive psychology across the globe and to ensure that the field continues to rest on this science. Second, IPPA wants to work for the effective and responsible application of positive psychology in diverse areas such as organizational psychology, counseling and clinical psychology, business, health, education, and coaching. The third mission of the organization is to foster education and training in the field. In all of these endeavors, we want to create rigorous standards for positive psychology, so that the field always represents the very best levels of current knowledge.

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

The Compassionate Friends

The Compassionate Friends

Year after year for nearly four decades, The Compassionate Friends has spread hope to more and more bereaved families. TCF has been widely recognized as a unique lifeline for those who are dealing with the tremendous grief that follows the death of a child. The organization has built this reputation in spite of struggling with the financial ups and downs that plague nearly all nonprofits.

From these financial struggles emerged the idea that a foundation might be created with the sole purpose of guaranteeing enough financial stability for The Compassionate Friends to always “be there” to provide emotional support to those who may see no hope. In 2000, thanks to the dedication and commitment of many members and friends of TCF, that dream came true with the creation of TCF Foundation.

While TCF Foundation has come a long way since its inception, there is still a long way to go before its mission can truly be reached. As a member of TCF or simply as a caring individual, you can support TCF Foundation through donations that can take many different forms.

Sidran Institute

sidran12

Sidran began in 1986 out of a family tragedy when a beloved family member who had been abused in childhood was subsequently diagnosed with serious, debilitating psychiatric problems and a related life-threatening medical disorder. Frustrated in their search for help for the complex needs of their family member at the time, the Sidran family convened professionals from a variety of disciplines, support program representatives, and national organizations to determine how they could best help their own loved one, and others. With each meeting it became apparent that gaps in basic understanding existed in service delivery, continuity of care, public policy, and sound research.

Sidran’s constituency is made up of any individuals or organizations touched by the effects of trauma, including

• adults, adolescents, and children who have experienced or witnessed traumatic events,
• supportive friends and family members,
• health, mental health, crisis, public safety, and victims services professionals
• support networks, schools, faith communities, and more.

Our Sponsor


Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women

Domestic abuse hotlineThe DAHMW is a nonprofit organization that helps men and women who are being abused by their spouses, boyfriends and girlfriends.  Their mission is to provide crisis intervention and support services to those who are abused and to help find a way to stop domestic violence from happening in the first place.

First founded in 2000, it offers help to heterosexual as well as same-sex victims, because violence knows no boundaries and is not a respecter of person, race, nationality or creed.  Their main specialization is to men who are abused by their women counterparts, however; as mentioned, no one is turned away from respect and support.

There is also a mailing list and a toll-free domestic violence hotline.  If you are being abused, please be sure to cover your tracks and call today!  Don’t hide in shame!

 

Debtors Anonymous

debtorsAre you constantly in debt?  Are you ashamed to even look at your receipts?  Afraid to answer your phone, or check your email or snail mail?  This site may definitely be what you are looking for.

While everyone from time to time may spend a little more money than they intended, it does become a problem when you spend way too much more than you have, or when creditors are calling your house daily, or when you cannot afford to get yourself out of the hole  you just spent yourself into.

You can get started in Debtors Anonymous, you can join and find a way to help with your problem, acknowledge that you have a problem, and find telephone or online meetings.  Today is the first step in your life to becoming debt-free.  Don’t let another day go by without making a change for the good.

Kristin Brooks Hope Center

kristen brooksOn April 7, 1998, Kristin Brooks committed suicide.  It was a horrible tragedy for those who knew and loved her.  What could be done, wondered her husband Reese Butler, to help those who were still alive and hurting like Kristin was that horrible April day?

The 1-800-SUICIDE phone number is just one of the many causes that were created because of Reese’s and the Center’s help and Kristin’s tragic end.  There is also an online crisis chat, college campus awareness events of suicide and its’ effects on not just the person committing the acts but their family and friends; and also music therapies.  They are also located on Facebook, MySpace and Twitter.

You can volunteer to help, or you can call to get help.  Either way, it’s a win-win situation.

Make the Connection: Veterans Stories & Support

make the connectionIf you are a veteran, or a family member or a friend of a veteran and searching for help, you are not alone.  Through the US Department of Veterans Affairs, this website will offer you a plethora of help.  With connections through Facebook and through Youtube, not to mention videos onsite and self-assessments; this site is a very good place to visit when needing help that you earned.

There is also a free Veterans Crisis Line to call, a resource locator, and a very awesome site customizer.  You served our country, and served it selflessly.  Don’t let this site pass you by!