Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

Beyond OCD

Beyond OCD

Beyond OCD,  the leading provider of consumer-friendly resources to help sufferers cope with and conquer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), works to increase public and professional awareness of OCD, educate and support people with OCD and their families, and to encourage research into new treatments and a cure.

We are a small organization with a big heart. A resource for individuals, families, mental health professionals, educators, clergy and the media across the country, we are dedicated to improving the lives of people who suffer with OCD.

The International OCD Foundation: Hoarding Center

international OCDHave you seen the television show The Hoarders?  Many people who watch this show may feel that this is just a very few people who experience such things, and those people on that show are not exactly “normal.”  Well, unfortunately, this is more normal than most people think.  Hoarding is very closely related to obsessive compulsive disorder, and there are people who have rooms and buildings and storage sheds that are full of items of things that they may never see again (or know they even have to begin with).

Thankfully, there are places that know about this kind of situation and are willing to help.  The International OCD Foundation:  Hoarding Center has many different options:  Journal Articles, Facebook Page, Research, Training, Assessments, and Resources such as Books, Videos, Links and more.  There are Community Services as well, and very importantly, Help for Hoarding for those who need it the most.

By opening the crack of light on hoarding a little more, we can make a light shine on this, and get more help for those who need it.

Veterans Crisis Line

vetrans crisis hotlineThe Veterans Crisis Line through the Veterans Administration helps connect veterans with mental health treatment they need.  There are confidential toll-free hotlines to call, online chatrooms, or text messages to help a Veteran in need of therapy and mental health treatment.

It’s all free, is around 24/7 for 365 days a year, and there is support for deaf and hard of hearing customers as well.  There are Suicide and Crisis Resources, and Self-Check Quizzes.

For all the Veterans who deserve all of our support for possibly giving up their lives for our country, the Veterans Administrations Crisis Line is well worth the time for those who gave us all.

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MentalHealth.Gov

mentalhealth.govOur own beloved DocJohn is currently at the Mental Health Conference in Washington, DC.  President Obama and Vice President Biden will be hosting the conference to hopefully create a new awareness of mental health issues.

The website included for this conference will enable you to watch the conference live; get help for others, yourself, and watch some videos on recovery.

There is also a newsroom, a myths and facts section–which is vital for everyone to check out–and what to look for in many disorders in mental health issues.

Psych Web

psych webWelcome to Psych Web written by Dr. Russ Dewey! This web site contains APA Style Resources, a couple of full-length classics in psychology:  Sigmund Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams and William James’ Varieties of Religious Experiences; and Psych Web includes Tip Sheets for Psychology students.

There is even a 725 page Introduction to Psychology textbook located on site, free of charge to read and print!  This site has many informative and helpful links that I still have yet to mention, but as you can see, it is well worth a visit!

Finally, to top it all off, there are a few Self-Help Resources listed, from Abuse:  Physical and Sexual to Violent Behavior.

 

General Psychology Youtube Lectures by Professor John Kihlstrom

UC Berkely Youtube Lectures by Professor John Kihlstrom.  Videos 1-25.  Informative for the person who is interested in psychology or may want to research more about it from a highly recommended school.  This is an introductory program, but can be a refresher program for some people as well.

Emergency Mental Health Educational Manual

This manual is written by the University of British Columbia, however; there are many facets here that will provide useful to those of us in the States. Mostly interesting to the the common layperson who is interested in psychology/psychiatry or the student, this manual is a well-thought out guide to how to help others when help is needed right now.