CDC’s WISQARS™ (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) is an interactive, online database that provides fatal and nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost of injury data from a variety of trusted sources. Researchers, the media, public health professionals, and the public can use WISQARS™ data to learn more about the public health and economic burden associated with unintentional and violence-related injury in the United States.

Users can search, sort, and view the injury data and create reports, charts, and maps based on the following:

  • Intent of injury (unintentional injury, violence-related, homicide/assault, legal intervention, suicide/intentional self-harm)
  • Mechanism (cause) of injury (e.g., fall, fire, firearm, motor vehicle crash, poisoning, suffocation)
  • Body region (e.g., traumatic brain injury, spinal cord, torso, upper and lower extremities)
  • Nature (type) of injury (e.g., fracture, dislocation, internal injury, open wound, amputation, and burn)
  • Geographic location (national, regional, state)
  • Sex, race/ethnicity, and age of the injured person



National Center for PTSD

National Center for PTSD The mission of the National Center for PTSD is to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s Veterans and others who have experienced trauma, or who suffer from PTSD, through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The VA National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s mission is:

To advance the clinical care and social welfare of America’s veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders.

The Center was created within the Department of Veterans Affairs in 1989, in response to a Congressional mandate to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD. “Advancing science and promoting understanding of traumatic stress” is the Center’s goal.

In 1995, the National Center created a website. Since September 11th, website usage has grown considerably, and in fiscal year 2006 the site had over 1 million unique users! The website strives to provide current, valid, professional information on a range of topics related to trauma and stress. The site is separated into sections each for one of a variety of audiences, including veterans and their families, clinicians, health care providers, researchers, and others who have or know someone who has experienced a trauma.

The website currently contains more than 1,600 documents, several newsletters you can subscribe to, extensive Web Resource links, and much more:

  • 140 fact sheets
  • 800 downloadable articles
  • Videos for veterans and their families, and for clinicians
  • PTSD 101: a series of expert lectures on PTSD
  • The PILOTS database (the largest interdisciplinary index to the worldwide literature on traumatic stress)
  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide
  • Information for disaster recovery including the Psychological First Aid manual



Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.



Center for Prevention of School Violence

centerfor the prevention of school violenceThe North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (NCDJJDP) has created a website to help stop school violence.  Finding out positive ways to deal with youth development for ALL youths can help curb some of the horrible violence that happens now.  Education is the best knowledge–the best way to help children understand that violence IS NOT the answer to issues in school.

The NCDJJDP has an alternative learning resource page with information about alternative learning, webcasts and resources about wanting to end the violence in schools, and a cafeteria page, dealing with nutrition and healthy eating.

There is a “question of the month” each month in the library which is very interesting to check out, and a parents resources and principals’ office.

The idea behind this website is that if every child can get a good, overall, balanced healthy school meal and school day while being treated fairly and responsibly, perhaps our days of school violence could be put behind us.  Wishful thinking perhaps, but one less school violence issue is well worth it, psychologically-wise as well as socially-wise.



Our Sponsor


A resource for people who use drugs, people who are considering using drugs, and people who care about people who use drugs.  Includes over 70 user defined addictions.



A Beginner’s Guide to Abnormal Psychology

One person in seven living in the US will require professional help for a psychological disorder at some time in their life. These disorders can take many forms and have a very wide range of symptoms. By helping people understand what these illnesses are and why they occur will help to take away from some of their mystique and better prepare people for dealing with these situations if they occur.

This site is specific to the field of abnormal psychology. Here you will find different perspectives regarding the interpretation of abnormal behavior, many of the common types of disorders, as well as some information on treatment for certain types of disorders. This site, however, is by no means all encompassing, but it does cover a very wide range of topics.



Fenichel’s Current Topics In Psychology

There are many, many topics here to choose from.  They are listed from A-Z. This site provides useful general references for both professionals and the general public.  There are many good resources here, including information, support groups, and clinical treatment providers.



Generally Thinking

The Psychology Study Guide:  An ebook I wrote for psychology students to help them get better grades and better understanding of the subject.

Rethink:  Kamila Wita has a blog on the site called Rethink, helping you look at mental health issues in a new way.

The Research Database:  A database pointing you to the research of the various sub-fields of psychology, to help you do psychology research.

Positive Psychology Digest:  Positive Psychology Digest is usually referred to as “The science of well-being and optimal functioning.” This category is a mixture of the theory and applications to come from fields that fit under this broad umbrella.