National Alliance for Grieving Children

National Alliance for Grieving Children

The National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC) provides a network for nationwide communication between hundreds of  professionals and volunteers who want to share ideas, information and resources with each other to better support the grieving children and families they serve in their own communities. Through this network, the NAGC offers online education, hosts an annual symposium on children’s grief, maintains a national data base of children’s bereavement support programs and promotes national awareness to enhance public sensitivity to the issues impacting grieving children and teens.

Located on this website is grants, symposiums, memberships, blogs, RSS feeds, activities, resources, discussions and support.

International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)

 

International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA)
ICSA’s mission is to apply research and professional perspectives to:

  • Help those who have been spiritually abused or otherwise harmed by psychological manipulation and high-demand groups
  • Educate the public
  • Promote and conduct research
  • Support helping professionals interested in cults, related groups, and psychological manipulation.

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National TSA has 2 full-time Information and Referral Coordinators with professional backgrounds in social work, psychology, education or related disciplines who answer email and telephone inquiries. We get requests for referrals to physicians or therapists (TSA maintains lists by state for Physicians and Allied Professionals as well as legal resources and various camps and schools). There are questions about Education-related issues (e.g. from teachers for pointers in the classroom, or from parents about teachers’ handling of symptoms in the classroom). Parents may be seeking options to better educate school personnel. Other requests for assistance are those seeking information about symptoms of TS and co-occurring disorders, treatment options, Social Security and Disability, ADA, and TS resources.  They may help with referral by email or telephone.  See the website for more information.

 

NADD (National Association for the Dually Diagnosed)

NADD (National Association for the Dually Diagnosed)

NADD, also known as The National Association for the Dually Diagnosed, was founded in 1983 as a not-for-profit Association. The catalyst for the founding of NADD arose from the need for an open forum to promote and exchange of ideas, principals & concepts concerning individuals who have the co-existence of  ID/D and mental illness.

NADD has been growing at a steady pace since its inception. We are now recognized as the leading organization providing conferences, educational services and training materials to many thousands of people in the United States and world-wide. Through the dissemination of cutting edge knowledge, we have been influential in the development of appropriate community based policies, programs, and opportunities in addressing the mental health needs of persons who have ID/D.

NADD has been successful in promoting services that bridge the gap between the mental health and developmental disabilities structures. The division of responsibility between the mental health and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities service systems has resulted all too often in a denial of comprehensive care and treatment for individuals who have ID/D concurrent with a serious mental health problem. NADD is a national leading force advocating on behalf of individuals who have mental illness and ID/D.

NADD has grown rapidly since its founding in 1983 and is now represented in every state in the United States and in Canada, Australia, Japan as well as in Europe.

Our Sponsor


The Scattergood Consensus Project

The Scattergood Concensus Project

Often, we complain about mental health policies (eg., HIPAA) yet find ourselves somewhat voiceless when it comes to what happens on the state or federal level. As an outcome of a national meeting last June, the Scattergood Foundation has put together two policy papers, one re Privacy and the other re Liberty. We are hoping to get input from as many “stakeholders” as possible. This is an opportunity to voice your concerns and also perhaps, gain a deeper insight into the ethical issues at hand.

The papers are online. Each is divided into short, one pg sections (about 8 per paper). For each section there is an opportunity for the reader to answer questions that will act as a “field test” for the ideas proposed. There are multiple-choice questions on each page as well as an opportunity to leave a comment. 

Please note: To review the papers you must create an user account, all the instructions can be viewed on www.scattergoodfoundation.org/consensus-project. We ask that you create an account so that we can contact you about how your input led to collaborative solutions and further discussion.  Your anonymity will be preserved – and your name will not appear anywhere on the website.

Reader recommendations will be analyzed during a 60-day commenting period and then synthesized by the Foundation for the purpose of creating recommendations.

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

Two young Swiss Psychiatrists, Christian Müller and Gaetano Benedetti, dissatisfied with the treatment of schizophrenia at the time, decided to gather together colleagues interested in the psychoanalytic treatment of schizophrenia. For the first 40 years of its existence the ISPS focused on organizing Symposiums every 3 years for clinicians to exchange ideas about their work. During these early years the ISPS acronym stood for the International Symposium for the Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia.

ISPS is an international organization promoting psychotherapy and psychological treatments for persons with psychosis. We are committed to advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders. We seek to achieve the best possible outcomes for service users by engaging in meaningful partnership with health professionals, service users, families and carers.

PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.

Positive Psychology Center

Positive Psychology Center

Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The field is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.

The mission of the Positive Psychology Center (PPC) at the University of Pennsylvania is to promote research, training, education, and the dissemination of Positive Psychology. The PPC is internationally recognized for empirical studies in Positive Psychology and resilience. The Center’s scholars are world-renowned experts in the fields of Positive Psychology, resilience, and grit. The Center established the world’s first Master of Applied Positive Psychology program (MAPP). We offer state-of-the-art training programs in Positive Psychology and resilience for educational institutions, the U.S. Army, and other organizations around the world.

Dr. Martin E.P. Seligman is the Director of the Center and a Professor of Psychology. He is a leading authority in the fields of Positive Psychology, resilience, learned helplessness, depression, optimism and pessimism. He is also an expert on interventions that prevent depression, and build strengths and well-being. He has written more than 250 scholarly publications and about 20 books.

The Positive Psychology Center is located at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Martin Seligman is the director of the center and Zellerbach Family Professor of Psychology.

The center promotes research, training, education, and the dissemination of Positive Psychology. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive.