GirlsHealth.Gov

Girlshealth.gov was created in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office on Women’s Health (OWH) to help girls (ages 10 to 16) learn about health, growing up, and issues they may face. Girlshealth.gov promotes healthy and positive behaviors in girls, giving them reliable and useful health information in a fun, easy-to-understand way. The website also provides information to parents and educators to help them teach girls about healthy living.

Our tagline is “Be Happy. Be Healthy. Be You. Beautiful.” It focuses on the idea that being yourself — finding what makes you smile and how to live well — is what makes you “you.” And that is beautiful!

The Trauma and Attachment Report

The Trauma and Attachment Report is a weekly online research report published out of York University in Toronto.  Its purpose is to provide clear, accurate information to members of the community, on the topic of interpersonal trauma.  The report will cover topics such as the causes and consequences of trauma; treatment, prevention, and implications of trauma for society at large.  The articles draw upon primary sources such as interviews with survivors, therapists, and others who work in the field of interpersonal trauma.  The Trauma and Attachment Report seeks to disseminate knowledge by discussing research findings published in reputable scientific journals, in a manner that can be easily understood by readers.

Please subscribe to our weekly newsletter by visiting the home page and entering your email in the “Subscribe” box and visit our Facebook Page for further information and regular updates. You may also follow us on Twitter and Linkedin. If you have a question, comment, or topic you’d like us to cover, feel free to email the Blog Coordinator at trauma.report@gmail.com, or leave a comment in the comment box available at the bottom of every article. We look forward to hearing from you!

APA: This is Psychology

These brief videos are intended to educate the general public about the science of psychology and to illustrate how psychological research can be applied to a broad range of issues and challenges. They are part of an expanded APA public education campaign to increase people’s understanding and appreciation of psychological science. We are particularly excited about their potential for use as part of secondary school psychology and other science programs.

The first release includes an introduction, an episode on bullying, and an episode on young children’s mental health. We hope you find them interesting and informative. Feel free to link to these videos from your professional websites. APA will be linking to them on our Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC)

In 1976, a group of interested educators and clinicians organized the Forum for Death Education and Counseling. Over the years, the organization grew to become the Association for Death Education and Counseling® (ADEC). ADEC is the oldest interdisciplinary organization in the field of dying, death and bereavement.

ADEC’s primary goal is to enhance the ability of professionals and laypeople to be better able to meet the needs of those with whom they work in death education and grief counseling.

As a nonprofit organization, the membership is made up of educators, counselors, nurses, physicians, hospital and hospice personnel, mental health professionals, clergy, funeral directors, social workers, philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, physical and recreational therapists, health well-being specialists and volunteers. All persons are welcome to join regardless of color, national origin, creed or gender. ADEC works to promote and share research, theories and practice in dying, death and bereavement.

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Gateway to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Information

PTSD is a medical diagnosis, established in 1980, defining symptoms that last at least a month after experiencing a major trauma. These symptoms include remembering or reliving the trauma when you do not choose to; feeling numb and withdrawn; and, having forms of anxiety that interfere with daily life.

Four national and international organizations are here to help, with articles, references, web-links, mini-courses, 800 phone access and e-mail pen-pal resources.

Bring Change 2 Mind

Bring Change 2 Mind is a national anti-stigma campaign founded by Glenn Close, The Balanced Mind Foundation, Fountain House, and Garen & Shari Staglin of the International Mental Health Rescue Organization (IMHRO), aimed at removing misconceptions about mental illness.  The idea was born out of a partnership between Glenn Close and Fountain House, where Glenn volunteered in order to learn more about mental illness, which both her sister, Jessie Close, and nephew, Calen Pick, live with.

Half of Us

Did you know that depression affects about 19 million people in the United States every year? College students are especially at risk with half reporting that they have been so stressed that they couldn’t function during the past year. The impact of mental illness is so devastating that suicide is the third leading cause of death among all people ages 15-24. With so many people struggling, why is it still hard for us to talk about “mental health?”

Nearly all mental health issues can be improved with proper treatment. When we decrease the stigma around mental health and encourage students to seek help if they need it, we are changing and saving lives.

What Makes Them Click–The Brain Lady

From Susan Weinschenk:  “If you’ve ever eavesdropped on a conversation in a country where you did not speak the language, you might have been surprised to find yourself following along and picking up the feeling of the conversation even though you didn’t understand any of the words or literal meaning. This is an entire field of research, and it’s called paralinguistics. It refers to vocal communication that is separate from the words that are spoken.

Think about this for a minute. You can say, “Sure, I’ll go with you to the store” in many different ways. You can say it with a lot of enthusiasm, with sarcasm, or with boredom. The way you say the sentence conveys as much meaning—or more—as the words themselves.”

Read more about Susan’s blog and also learn how to be able to better communicate and get your thoughts and feelings across with others.