MindYourMind

 MindYourMind

These resources are designed to reduce the stigma associated with mental illness and increase access and use of community support, both professional and peer-based.

Through the use of active engagement, best practice and technology, MindYourMind inspires youth to reach out, get help and give help.

This site has tips for when you are in crisis, need help, creating wellness for yourself, facts about all kinds of mental illness, fun interactive apps and games, personal expressions, interviews and ways to get involved and help others.

World Psychiatric Association

World Psychiatric AssociationThe WPA is an association of national psychiatric societies aimed to increase knowledge and skills necessary for work in the field of mental health and the care for the mentally ill. Its member societies are presently 135, spanning 117 different countries and representing more than 200,000 psychiatrists.

The WPA organizes the World Congress of Psychiatry every three years. It also organizes international and regional congresses and meetings, and thematic conferences. It has 65 scientific sections, aimed to disseminate information and promote collaborative work in specific domains of psychiatry. It has produced several educational programs and series of books.

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National TSA has 2 full-time Information and Referral Coordinators with professional backgrounds in social work, psychology, education or related disciplines who answer email and telephone inquiries. We get requests for referrals to physicians or therapists (TSA maintains lists by state for Physicians and Allied Professionals as well as legal resources and various camps and schools). There are questions about Education-related issues (e.g. from teachers for pointers in the classroom, or from parents about teachers’ handling of symptoms in the classroom). Parents may be seeking options to better educate school personnel. Other requests for assistance are those seeking information about symptoms of TS and co-occurring disorders, treatment options, Social Security and Disability, ADA, and TS resources.  They may help with referral by email or telephone.  See the website for more information.

 

The Other OCD

The Other OCD

This site discusses those strange, bizarre and disturbing OCD thoughts, sometimes called Purely Obsessional Compulsive Disorder (or “Pure-O”).  Things like:  “Is that cop following me?”, “Is my breathing weird?”, or “Have I hurt someone and not known it?”

Most people consider the whole OCD issue, but this group has mainly just the obsessions and hardly any of the compulsions.

This website also includes help for family and friends, books and articles, downloadable audio, and information for therapists.

Our Sponsor


No Kidding? Me Too!

No Kidding?  Me Too!

No Kidding, Me Too! is a 501(c)(3) public charity, whose purpose is to remove the stigma attached to brain dis-ease (BD) through education and the breaking down of societal barriers. Our goal is to empower those with BD to admit their illness, seek treatment, and become even greater members of society.

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS)

Two young Swiss Psychiatrists, Christian Müller and Gaetano Benedetti, dissatisfied with the treatment of schizophrenia at the time, decided to gather together colleagues interested in the psychoanalytic treatment of schizophrenia. For the first 40 years of its existence the ISPS focused on organizing Symposiums every 3 years for clinicians to exchange ideas about their work. During these early years the ISPS acronym stood for the International Symposium for the Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia.

ISPS is an international organization promoting psychotherapy and psychological treatments for persons with psychosis. We are committed to advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders. We seek to achieve the best possible outcomes for service users by engaging in meaningful partnership with health professionals, service users, families and carers.

PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.