American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)

AACAP partners with our members in advocacy efforts at the federal and state levels to improve policies and services for children and adolescents with mental illness. We work to educate policymakers and administrators about issues affecting child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health and regularly engage our members on pertinent legislation and regulatory activities. AACAP continually develops resources for members to use as they communicate with policymakers about issues related to child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health. Make your voice heard on behalf of children with mental illness! Through AACAP’s Legislative Action Center, you can take action on our current federal advocacy alerts, correspond with your members of Congress and the Administration, and contact your local media. And AACAP sends regular advocacy updates and action alerts to keep members updated on federal and state legislation and provide opportunities to get involved. Click here to read past updates and alerts.




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Alternative Considerations Of Jonestown & People’s Temple

Alternative Considerations Of Jonestown & People's Temple

Welcome to “Alternative Considerations of Jonestown and Peoples Temple,” sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies at San Diego State University. This website is designed to give personal and scholarly perspectives on a major event in the history of religion in America. Its primary purpose is to present information about Peoples Temple as accurately and objectively as possible. In an effort to be impartial, we offer many diverse views and opinions about the Temple and the events in Jonestown.

We hope that visitors to the site will come away with an understanding that the story of Jonestown did not start or end on 18 November 1978.




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Society for Community Research and Action

Society for Community Research and Action

The Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA) – Community Psychology, Division 27 of the American Psychological Association – serves many different disciplines that focus on community research and action. Our members are committed to promoting health and empowerment and to preventing problems in communities, groups, and individuals.Four broad principles guide SCRA: Community research and action requires explicit attention to and respect for diversity among peoples and settings; human competencies and problems are best understood by viewing people within their social, cultural, economic, geographic, and historical contexts; community research and action is an active collaboration among researchers, practitioners, and community members that uses multiple methodologies. Such research and action must be undertaken to serve those community members directly concerned, and should be guided by their needs and preferences, as well as by their active participation; and finally to change strategies are needed at multiple levels in order to foster settings that promote competence and well-being.




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National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

NASP

School psychologists are uniquely qualified members of school teams that support students’ abilities to learn and teachers’ abilities to teach. They apply expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. School psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections among home, school, and the community.

The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) represents and supports the profession of school psychology by advancing effective practices to improve students’ learning, behavior and mental health and maintaining essential standards for ethics and practice.




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NAADAC The Association for Addiction Professionals

naadac

The addiction profession workforce is estimated at more than 85,000 individuals that include counselors, educators, and other addiction-focused health care professionals who specialize in addiction prevention, intervention, treatment, recovery support, and education.

Most addiction professionals are employed in the following industries: outpatient care centers; residential mental retardation, mental health and substance abuse facilities; individual and family services; local government; general medical and surgical hospitals; psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals; and private practice. Many other addiction professionals work in prisons, probation or parole agencies, juvenile detention facilities, halfway houses, detox centers and employee assistance programs.




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Life After Hate

Life After Hate

Based on our own powerful narratives of transformation and decades of experience in the extreme far-right, we support schools, community groups, NGOs, and other organizations that have a desire to understand, teach, heal, prevent, and counter racism and violent extremism in their communities.

We are engaged in academic research, with reputable partners, to understand individual-level pathways into and out of extremism.  This understanding enables us to develop strategies and solutions to counter violent extremism in its many forms.

Through our program ExitUSA, we help radicalized individuals disengage from extremist movements and begin the process of deradicalization.  Our own unique experiences position us in the best place possible to understand the challenges and support needed to assist those who want to leave, or who have already left an extremist movement on their own.  We also support community practitioners (counselors, social workers, faith leaders, etc.) and families who are working with individuals who have the desire to change.




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Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT)

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT)

ABCT has been at the forefront of the professional, legal, social, and ethical controversies and dissemination efforts that have accompanied the field’s evolution. The training of mental health professionals has also been a significant priority for the association. An ongoing debate within the association concerns what many consider to be a movement away from basic behavioral science as the field has attempted to advance and, in doing so, integrate more and more “new” therapies/specializations, particularly the addition of cognitive theory and its variety of techniques. The field’s desire to maintain its scientific foundations and yet continue to advance and grow was reflected in its most recent discussion about adding the word “cognitive” to the name of the association.




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BDP Central

BDP Central

Being a borderline feels like eternal hell. Nothing less. Pain, anger, confusion, never knowing how I’m gonna feel from one minute to the next. Hurting because I hurt those whom I love. Feeling misunderstood. Nothing gives me pleasure. Wanting to die but not being able to kill myself because I’d feel too much guilt for those I’d hurt, and then feeling angry about that so I cut myself or take an overdose to make all the feelings go away.

Some assumptions about BPD may include:

I must be loved by all the important people in my life always or else I am worthless. I must be completely competent in all ways to be a worthwhile person.

Some people are good and everything about them is perfect. Other people are thoroughly bad and should be severely blamed and punished for it.

My feelings are always caused by external events. I have no control over my emotions or the things I do in reaction to them.

Nobody cares about me as much as I care about them, so I always lose everyone I care about-despite the desperate things I try to do to stop them from leaving me.

If someone treats me badly, then I become bad.

When I am alone, I become nobody and nothing.

I will be happy only when I can find an all-giving, perfect person to love me and take care of me no matter what.

But if someone close to this loves me, then something must be wrong with them.

I can’t stand the frustration that I feel when I need something from someone and I can’t get it. I’ve got to do something to make it go away.




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