Social Anxiety Institute

Social Anxiety Institute

Dr. Thomas A. Richards currently runs all our treatment programs and is a leading clinical authority on the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Dr. Richards began seeing patients with social anxiety in the early 1990s and has seen thousands of patients since that time. The first CBT therapy group for social anxiety started in 1994. International therapy groups began in 1998.
Our emphasis is on treatment of social anxiety disorder (i.e., how do you get over it?) Our CBT therapy programs allow people to overcome social anxiety.
Cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder must be comprehensive and cover all aspects of social anxiety. Our groups are active, structured groups that work on anti-anxiety strategies on a daily, consistent basis. Cognitive therapy includes strategies to learn how to think and believe differently about ourselves. Behavioral therapy puts the cognitive strategies into place in your daily life.

PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma

The Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), originally founded at the Harvard School of Public Health, is a multi-disciplinary program that has been pioneering the health and mental health care of traumatized refugees and civilians in areas of conflict/post-conflict and natural disasters for over two decades. Its clinical program serves as a global model that has been replicated worldwide. HPRT designed and implemented the first curriculum for the mental health training of primary care practitioners in settings of human conflict, post-conflict, and natural disasters. Its training activities have been successfully conducted in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Japan, and the United States. HPRT’s landmark scientific studies have demonstrated the medical and mental health impact of mass violence as well as the cultural effectiveness of its clinical treatment and training programs. Working closely with Ministries of Health throughout the world, HPRT has developed community-based mental health services primarily in existing local primary health care systems. It has also successfully established linkages to major foreign university settings. HPRT’s bicultural partnerships with international collaborators have resulted in culturally effective and sustainable programs that rely primarily on local human resources and indigenous healing systems. In order to achieve its mission, memorandums of agreements have been signed between HPRT and universities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Italy, Japan, and Thailand. As a university-wide program, HPRT has access to the full resources and talents of Harvard University, including the Medical School (HMS), the School of Public Health, the School of Education, and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). HPRT is currently administered by MGH, one of America’s oldest and most prestigious hospitals, which is a major teaching hospital of HMS.

Beyond OCD

Beyond OCD

Beyond OCD,  the leading provider of consumer-friendly resources to help sufferers cope with and conquer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), works to increase public and professional awareness of OCD, educate and support people with OCD and their families, and to encourage research into new treatments and a cure.

We are a small organization with a big heart. A resource for individuals, families, mental health professionals, educators, clergy and the media across the country, we are dedicated to improving the lives of people who suffer with OCD.

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Military Pathways Mental Health Screening

military pathwaysBeing in the military alone can be severely stressful.  Adding a family, or a war, or threat of war to the equation definitely makes it much more stressful.  This website is tied in with the United States Department of Defense and the nonprofit organization, Screening for Mental Health, who are trying to find via assessments if a military man or woman is experiencing traumatic events.

For instance, these assessments will help a person find out whether or not they might have some common mental health issues including, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, alcohol problems and more. Of course, just as with Psych Central, the screening will not provide a diagnosis – for that you need to see your own professional.   It will help point you towards a direction, tell you what you might have and where best you can seek assistance.

Best of all, your screening can be anonymous.  No one will come up and show your results and say this is Dr. Clyde’s results.  This will definitely help you if you feel you need the help.  Don’t wait any longer!

Mirror, Mirror Eating Disorders

mirror mirrorUpfront, this website is not a website that is for a person who needs a Doctor who would come and tell you what to do with your Eating Disorder or whether you even have an Eating Disorder.  However; that being said, this website is well worth it’s weight (no pun intended) as it understands and appreciates the suffering and shame you might be going through.

Started back in 1997 by Colleen Thompson, when she was having an eating disorder issue, she wanted to educate herself and provide support to herself and others who need assistance from the eating disorder.  Mirror, Mirror even asks that if you do not find the information on their website that pertains to you that you can email them and they will either try to include the information or direct you to a website or to somewhere where the information can be found.

With any kind of disorder people are suffering from, there are two things:  people don’t want to have it (of course), and people want to know they are not suffering alone.  This site helps those who suffer from Eating Disorders to alleviate the later, and hopefully the former.

Implicit Association Test (Project Implicit)

project implcitProject Implicit is a group of assessments in which a person is given choices to compare from about a person’s race, sex, identity, religious or other possible biases.  This social psychology assessment basically tries to combine a mental strength of a person’s thoughts with pictures they may see of a person who may fit that profile in order to establish how much of a bias exists.  For instance; with the sex test, you would be expected to see pictures of females and males, for race, one race versus another or more.

While taking this group of implicit association tests–you can take 15 different ones at the beginning–you may feel that your bias is not “correct.”  That is okay!  Please remember that this is just a tool to use to see what kind of possible biases you may have.  If anything else, it is a nice assessment just to try to see what comes up when you try it and find.

The International OCD Foundation: Hoarding Center

international OCDHave you seen the television show The Hoarders?  Many people who watch this show may feel that this is just a very few people who experience such things, and those people on that show are not exactly “normal.”  Well, unfortunately, this is more normal than most people think.  Hoarding is very closely related to obsessive compulsive disorder, and there are people who have rooms and buildings and storage sheds that are full of items of things that they may never see again (or know they even have to begin with).

Thankfully, there are places that know about this kind of situation and are willing to help.  The International OCD Foundation:  Hoarding Center has many different options:  Journal Articles, Facebook Page, Research, Training, Assessments, and Resources such as Books, Videos, Links and more.  There are Community Services as well, and very importantly, Help for Hoarding for those who need it the most.

By opening the crack of light on hoarding a little more, we can make a light shine on this, and get more help for those who need it.