Council on Undergraduate Research

Council on Undergraduate Research
The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and its affiliated colleges, universities, and individuals share a focus on providing undergraduate research opportunities for faculty and students at all institutions serving undergraduate students. CUR believes that faculty members enhance their teaching and contribution to society by remaining active in research and by involving undergraduates in research. CUR’s leadership works with agencies and foundations to enhance research opportunities for faculty and students. CUR provides support for faculty development. Our publications and outreach activities are designed to share successful models and strategies for establishing and institutionalizing undergraduate research programs. We assist administrators and faculty members in improving and assessing the research environment at their institutions. CUR also provides information on the importance of undergraduate research to state legislatures, private foundations, government agencies, and the U.S. Congress. CUR welcomes faculty and administrators from all academic institutions. Our primary advocacy is in support of faculty and undergraduate students engaged in research. CUR achieves its vision through efforts of its membership as organized in a divisional structure that includes arts and humanities, biology, chemistry, engineering, geosciences, health sciences, mathematics and computer science, physics and astronomy, psychology, social sciences, an at-large division that serves administrators and other disciplines, and a division for directors of undergraduate research programs.
Definition of Undergraduate Research: An inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate student that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline.
The Council on Undergraduate Research, founded in 1978, is a national organization of individual and institutional members representing over 900 colleges and universities.

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Formerly NARSAD)

Our mission:
The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation is committed to alleviating the suffering caused by mental illness by awarding grants that will lead to advances and breakthroughs in scientific research.

How we do it:
100% of all donor contributions for research are invested in NARSAD GRANTS leading to discoveries in understanding causes and improving treatments of disorders in children and adults, such as depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, autism, and bipolar, attention-deficit hyperactivity, post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

Our credentials:
Over a quarter of a century, we have awarded over $328 million worldwide to more than 3,700 scientists carefully selected by our prestigious Scientific Council.

Our vision:
To bring the joy of living to those affected by mental illness – those who are ill and their loved ones.

Our values:
What we believe:

  • Better treatments and breakthroughs come from scientific discovery.
  • Only fund scientists whose research is reviewed and recommended by a world-renowned Scientific Council including Nobel prize winners and chairs of psychiatric departments.
  • 100% of contributions for research go directly to research. Costs for administration and fund raising are underwritten by outside grants.
  • Our financial operations must be transparent. Those who manage our Foundation must be committed to honesty and integrity.
  • Strategic partnerships that further our mission will be developed with transparency.

iFred

iFred

The mission of International Foundation for Research and Education on Depression (iFred) is to shine a positive light on depression and eliminate the stigma associated with the disease through prevention, research and education. Its goal is to ensure 100% of the 350 million people affected by depression seek and receive treatment.

iFred is creating a shift in society’s negative perception of depression through positive imagery and branding—establishing the sunflower and color yellow as the international symbols of hope for depression. To further its mission, iFred engages with individuals and organizations to execute high-impact and effective campaigns that educate the public about support and treatment for depression.

Real Warriors

Real Warriors

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.
To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive website, mobile website and social media. The campaign features stories of real service members who reached out for psychological support or care with successful outcomes, including learning coping skills, maintaining their security clearance and continuing to succeed in their military or civilian careers. These Real Warriors are proving through example that reaching out is a sign of strength that benefits the entire military community.
In addition, the campaign encourages use of the DCoE Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.

Our Sponsor


To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)

It’s been nine years since Jamie posted the original TWLOHA story online, and we’re still here. We’re still working to let people know that hope is real and that they can get the help they deserve. Your story is important.

This began in the spring of 2006, when To Write Love on Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story about a friend struggling with depression, addiction, and self- injury. The words and the life it represented shed light on the reality of contrast—pain and peace, addiction and sobriety, regret and freedom. The title, “To Write Love on Her Arms,” also represented a goal—to believe that a better life was possible. A MySpace page was created to give the story a home, and T-shirts were sold to pay for the friend’s treatment.

As the days passed and the blog was shared, it became clear that this story was not just about one person. We heard from people longing to lift the heavy weight of depression, to be free from addiction or self-injury, to stay alive and live fully. We also heard from people mourning those they’d lost to such struggles, asking what they could do to bring hope to their communities. We learned that two out of three people who struggle with depression never seek help, and that untreated depression is the leading cause of suicide. In America alone, it’s estimated that 19 million people live with depression, and suicide is the third-leading cause of death among those 15-24 years old. It seemed we had stumbled into a bigger story, a conversation that needed to be had. These are issues of humanity, problems of pain that affect millions of people around the world, regardless of age, race, gender, religious belief, orientation, and background.

Over the years, TWLOHA has become much more than a blog and a T-shirt. Through musician support, tours, and social media, the message of hope and help has reached an audience broader than we could have ever anticipated. We’ve expanded from a computer screen to conferences, campuses, programs, and events around the country and the world, where we challenge the stigma and stereotypes that have surrounded mental health issues for so long. And we’re investing into treatment and recovery, offering financial support to organizations, centers, and individuals laboring in the priceless work of healing.

TWLOHA is honored to be a part of this continuing story, to invite people into the conversation, and to be a bridge to the better life we continue to believe is possible.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

AFSP is a multifaceted organization made up of esteemed scientists, dedicated survivors of suicide loss, people with mental disorders and their families, and an expansive network of business and community leaders.

We are at once a grassroots movement, a support network, an educator, a professional research organization and a grant-making foundation. We organize hundreds of events in communities across the country, raising millions of dollars each year to support our work, both locally and nationally. We advocate for social change, supporting policies that contribute to reducing and preventing suicides nationwide. While AFSP does not provide direct services, such as counseling or running a crisis hotline, we do work closely with the organizations providing these services. Through these many roles, we reach hundreds of thousands of people every year. Increasingly, the media has turned to AFSP as their go-to source of expertise on suicide and its prevention. In collaboration with our volunteers and program participants, the following people help to make all of these things happen. To fully achieve its mission, AFSP engages in the following Five Core Strategies:

  • Fund scientific research
  • Offer educational programs for professionals
  • Educate the public about mood disorders and suicide prevention
  • Promote policies and legislation that impact suicide and prevention
  • Provide programs and resources for survivors of suicide loss and people at risk, and involve them in the work of the Foundation.

 

Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists

Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists

AGLP (Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists):

 

  • Publish a quarterly newsletter (free to members)
  • Publish the quarterly Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, the official journal of the Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists, and provide a free subscription for all full, associate, early career, and medical student members;
  • Conduct a full schedule of seminars and discussion groups concurrent with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA);
  • Sponsor several awards honoring the accomplishments of people and organizations that contribute to the well-being of the LGBT community;
  • Sponsor social gatherings and a hospitality suite at the annual meeting of the APA and other psychiatric meetings;
  • Work within the APA to influence policies relevant to the lesbian and gay community;
  • Collaborate with other organizations of gay and lesbian physicians and mental health professionals;
  • Provide referral services for lesbian and gay patients;
  • Assist medical students and residents in their professional development;
  • Encourage and facilitate the presentation of programs and publications relevant to gay and lesbian concerns at professional meetings; and
  • Serve as liaison with other minority and advocacy groups within the psychiatric community.

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health

The mission of the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma and Mental Health is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant, and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so that survivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety, resilience, and well-being. We provide training and support to advocates, mental health and substance providers, legal professionals, policymakers, and government officials as they work to improve the ways that their agencies and systems respond to survivors of domestic and their children. Specially, our work includes (1) raising public awareness about the intersection of domestic violence, trauma, mental health, and substance abuse; (2) providing training and technical assistance to build the capacities of agencies and systems to address the traumatic effects of abuse; (3) developing and promoting policies that improve agency and system responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma; and (4) analyzing and promoting research that advances knowledge and builds the evidence base for responding to trauma in the lives of domestic violence survivors and their children.