BDP Central

BDP Central

Being a borderline feels like eternal hell. Nothing less. Pain, anger, confusion, never knowing how I’m gonna feel from one minute to the next. Hurting because I hurt those whom I love. Feeling misunderstood. Nothing gives me pleasure. Wanting to die but not being able to kill myself because I’d feel too much guilt for those I’d hurt, and then feeling angry about that so I cut myself or take an overdose to make all the feelings go away.

Some assumptions about BPD may include:

I must be loved by all the important people in my life always or else I am worthless. I must be completely competent in all ways to be a worthwhile person.

Some people are good and everything about them is perfect. Other people are thoroughly bad and should be severely blamed and punished for it.

My feelings are always caused by external events. I have no control over my emotions or the things I do in reaction to them.

Nobody cares about me as much as I care about them, so I always lose everyone I care about-despite the desperate things I try to do to stop them from leaving me.

If someone treats me badly, then I become bad.

When I am alone, I become nobody and nothing.

I will be happy only when I can find an all-giving, perfect person to love me and take care of me no matter what.

But if someone close to this loves me, then something must be wrong with them.

I can’t stand the frustration that I feel when I need something from someone and I can’t get it. I’ve got to do something to make it go away.




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Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

The site is managed by a group of independent volunteers and contractors around the world – most of whom are either family members (with sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, or parents who have suffered from schizophrenia) or people who have schizophrenia. While most of our writers are students of psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience, for the most part we are not full-time working mental health professionals but we are very familiar with the disease both through direct personal experience and extensive reading on the topic.

We rely upon what we believe are good sources of scientifically accurate materials relating to schizophrenia and frequently consult with an ever growing group of schizophrenia researchers who act as unofficial advisors to the site.




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National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA)

National TSA has 2 full-time Information and Referral Coordinators with professional backgrounds in social work, psychology, education or related disciplines who answer email and telephone inquiries. We get requests for referrals to physicians or therapists (TSA maintains lists by state for Physicians and Allied Professionals as well as legal resources and various camps and schools). There are questions about Education-related issues (e.g. from teachers for pointers in the classroom, or from parents about teachers’ handling of symptoms in the classroom). Parents may be seeking options to better educate school personnel. Other requests for assistance are those seeking information about symptoms of TS and co-occurring disorders, treatment options, Social Security and Disability, ADA, and TS resources.  They may help with referral by email or telephone.  See the website for more information.

 




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PsychAlive: Psychology for Everyday Life

PsychAlive:  Psychology for Everyday Life

Our desire to discover who we are – why we feel and act the ways we do – is what leads us to a meaningful and vital existence. PsychAlive was created to assist you in this personal journey by providing a place where people can learn to take an active, introspective approach to their lives. The articles, blogs, videos, quizzes and interactive workshops featured on PsychAlive introduce visitors to sound psychological principles and practices, while offering an insightful means of coping with life’s everyday problems. The tools available on PsychAlive are designed to help people understand the emotional dynamics that operate within us and the limitations that restrict us in our daily lives. By helping us to recognize what’s at the core of our emotional struggles and to target the specific ways we limit ourselves, PsychAlive encourages us to understand and challenge the deeper issues that keep us from living a life that is as joyful, rewarding and meaningful as it could be.




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National Coalition for the Homeless

national coalition for the homelessThe National Coalition for the Homeless is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission: To prevent and end homelessness while ensuring the immediate needs of those experiencing homelessness are met and their civil rights protected.

We envision a world where everyone has a safe, decent, affordable and accessible home. We are committed to creating the systemic and attitudinal changes necessary to prevent and end homelessness. We take as our first principle of practice that people who are currently experiencing homelessness or have formerly experienced homelessness must be actively involved in all of our work. Our programs are centered around public education, policy advocacy, and grassroots organizing, and are focused on the issues of housing justice, economic justice, health care justice, and civil rights.




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The University of Akron Center for the History of Psychology

The Center for the History of Psychology (CHP) is located at The University of Akron in Akron, Ohio. It is a unique institution that cares for, provides access to, and interprets the historical record of psychology and related human sciences.

The CHP includes a museum of psychology that highlights artifacts, documents, films, and photographs from the history of the human sciences. It is also home to the Archives of the History of American Psychology, comprised of a vast collection of artifacts, media, and documents, including the personal papers of many important psychologists.

The CHP opens its doors to scholars, students of all ages, and visitors from across the globe who come to view and work with these one-of-a-kind collections.




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Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC)

In 1976, a group of interested educators and clinicians organized the Forum for Death Education and Counseling. Over the years, the organization grew to become the Association for Death Education and Counseling® (ADEC). ADEC is the oldest interdisciplinary organization in the field of dying, death and bereavement.

ADEC’s primary goal is to enhance the ability of professionals and laypeople to be better able to meet the needs of those with whom they work in death education and grief counseling.

As a nonprofit organization, the membership is made up of educators, counselors, nurses, physicians, hospital and hospice personnel, mental health professionals, clergy, funeral directors, social workers, philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, physical and recreational therapists, health well-being specialists and volunteers. All persons are welcome to join regardless of color, national origin, creed or gender. ADEC works to promote and share research, theories and practice in dying, death and bereavement.




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American Association of Suicidology

The goal of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) is to understand and prevent suicide.

We accomplish this mission by directing efforts to:

Advance Suicidology as a science; encouraging, developing and disseminating scholarly work in suicidology.

Encourage the development and application of strategies that reduce the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviors.

Compile, develop, evaluate and disseminate accurate information about suicidal behaviors to the public.

Foster the highest possible quality of suicide prevention, intervention and postvention to the public.

Publicize official AAS positions on issues of public policy relating to suicide.

Promote research and training in suicidology.

Founded in 1968 by Edwin S. Shneidman, Ph.D., AAS promotes research, public awareness programs, public education and training for professionals and volunteers. In addition, AAS serves as a national clearinghouse for information on suicide.

The membership of AAS includes mental health and public health professionals, researchers, suicide prevention and crisis intervention centers, school districts, crisis center volunteers, survivors of suicide and a variety of lay persons who have an interest in suicide prevention.

AAS, a not-for-profit organization, encourages and welcomes both individual and organizational members.




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